mobility

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mobility

the degree to which a FACTOR OF PRODUCTION is willing or able to move between different locations or uses. Of the three factors of production, i.e. NATURAL RESOURCES (land), LABOUR and CAPITAL, land is geographically immobile, but not necessarily the uses to which it can be put, for example, industry or agriculture. Labour is both geographically and occupationally mobile but is not necessarily willing to move to another location or retrain for another occupation. Capital (in the form of plant and machinery) is frequently relatively immobile because it is difficult to find new uses for specialized plant, and often difficult to change location because of the size and nature of such plant (e.g. electricity-generating machinery). See RESOURCE ALLOCATION, SUPPLY-SIDE ECONOMICS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequencies and percentages were presented for all qualitative variables: gender, anatomic location, swelling, pain, caries, tooth mobility, sinus, paraesthesia, unilocular, multilocular, smooth, sclerotic, poorly defined margins and association with impacted tooth.
Hence, the results of comparative analyses of target features and oral health quality for statistically relevant differences have shown that the oral health quality is in accordance with the age and denture type and depends on the following: basic difficulties, IKP contact, tooth mobility, paradontopathy, parafunction activities of OF system (bruxism), arthropathy, time elapsed from tooth edentulation to denture embedding, denture stability, comfort/discomfort in wearing dentures, etc.
Oral manifestations include bruxism, xerostomia, increased risk for caries, attrition, abfraction, acid erosion, tooth mobility, tooth fracture and scalloped tongue.
Tooth mobility and alveolar bone resorption as a function of occlusal stress and oral hygiene.
Tooth mobility and the biological rationale for splinting teeth.
Patients may also have a feeling that something is caught in the throat, a chronic sore throat or voice change (hoarseness) that persists more than six weeks, swelling of the jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable, neck swelling present for more than three weeks, unexplained tooth mobility persisting for more than three weeks, persistent nasal obstruction and unexplained persistent earache.
Based on the clinical and radiographic findings showing tooth mobility and attachment loss at more than 30% of sites in the mouth [Wiebe and Putnins, 2000], the patient was diagnosed as having generalised aggressive periodontitis (GAP).
Numerical simulation of tooth mobility using nonlinear model of the periodontal ligament has been carried out [5].
Periodontal signs are: gingival recession, alveolar bone resorption, tooth mobility, Stillman's striated (Popa, 2004).
Experimental and numerical determination of initial tooth mobility and material properties of the periodontal ligament in rat molar specimens.
Clinical features of periodontitis include bleeding, pus discharge, halitosis, tooth mobility, functional impairment and ultimately tooth loss.
Denturists are not trained in the diagnosis or treatment of tooth and gum diseases such as caries, periodontal disease, tooth mobility and occlusion.