Tooth

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Tooth

Describing paper with rough texture, which makes the paper able to receive ink more easily.
References in periodicals archive ?
This method has fewer complications than enucleation regarding the preservation of important anatomical structures and developing tooth germs.
in 1973 and 1976 defined four developmental crowns and four developmental root stages which were based on radiological tooth germs.
On the other hand, gemination is defined as incomplete division of one tooth germ, resulting in the formation of two partially or completely separated crowns formed on a single root.
We also consider that the extra molar presented by the specimen UFMT 839 is a malformation, due to some kind of stochastic process during later stages of development of the distal tooth germ (see Glasstone, 1952; Wolsan, 1984:131), rather than earlier developmental process like reported by Sofaer and Shaw (1971).
Fusion occurs because of the union of two separated tooth germs with a resultant formation of joint tooth with confluence of dentine.
24) This cytokeratin expression profile suggests that odontomas are analogs of the developing tooth germ that lack complete differentiation of preameloblasts or ameloblasts and display abnormal enamel organ mineral ization.
Transgenically ectopic expression of BMP4 to the MSX1 mutant dental mesenchyme restores downstream gene expression but represses SHH and BMP2 in the enamel knot of wild type tooth germ.
A new function of BMP-4: dual role for BMP-4 regulation of sonic hedgehog expression in the mouse tooth germ.
From each deciduous tooth germ at its bell stage a lingual successional lamina grows from the site of continuity between outer and enamel epithelium and dental lamina.
Comparative immunohistochemical analysis between jaw myxoma and mesenchymal cells of tooth germ.
These structures will develop into the tooth germ and its associated supporting tissues.
This leads to failure of tooth germs to develop as a result of accelerated and increased apoptosis in the dental lamina connecting the oral epithelium and the tooth germ (Lukinmaa et al.