Seat

(redirected from took seat)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to took seat: took a back seat, takes a seat

Seat

Position of membership on a securities or commodity exchange, bought and sold at market prices.

Seat

An individual or firm's right to trade on an exchange floor. Seats are bought and sold according to an individual's or firm's needs and desires, and they can be very expensive. Most exchanges have a set number of seats; for example, on the New York Stock Exchange there are 1366 seats, which may cost up to $1 million each. Most exchanges only recognize individual members; member firms are usually informal terms for broker-dealer firms that have at least one principal officer with a seat on an exchange. A seat is also called a membership.

seat

Membership on an organized securities exchange. Because the number of seats on an exchange is generally fixed, membership may be acquired only by purchasing a seat from an existing owner at a negotiated or an offered price.
References in periodicals archive ?
The couple took seats directly in front of the orchestra for the performance.
Newcomers Dennis Gillette, the former police chief and top vote-getter in the fall election, and Dan Del Campo, a Zeanah-supported slow-growth proponent, took seats on the dais, as did returning Councilman Andy Fox, who was elected to a second term.
The figures cover only the first three months of the year and Lord Ashcroft is estimated to have funded three-quarters of the Conservatives who took seats on May 5.
Eyebrows were raised inside the television studio when the celebrity couple then took seats some distance apart.
Some took seats, some took sod, some took pictures.
Ruling Labour bosses vowed to work hard to drive the BNP from Sandwell after the party took seats at Princes End, Great Bridge and Tividale, handing it a total of four representatives on the borough council.
Labour's stunning 1997 success was built on the progress made in 1992, when it took seats including Birmingham Northfield and Selly Oak from the Tories.
A growing number of Catholics who took seats on local policing bodies earlier this year have been targeted recently.
Dwarfed by the sheer size of the building which houses Dowanhill Primary in Partick, Glasgow, seven children, aged between five and 11, took seats in two classrooms.
Sinn Fein's talks team members Martin McGuinness and Pat Doherty took seats early.