Tip

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Tip

Information given by one trader to another, which is used in making buy or sell decisions but is not available to the general public.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Tip

1. Information on a security, company, or anything else provided by one investor or trader to another that is not available to the general public, that can produce significant profits if it proves to be accurate. See also: Inside information.

2. See: Gratuity.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

tip

Information unavailable to the general public that, if accurate, could produce extraordinary profits for an investor who acts on it in a security transaction.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"In many Arab countries, tipping is sometimes the only way to get around.
"People should always keep the culture of tipping even when things have slightly gone up because I believe the more you give out to others, the more you get in return," she said.
France tip ten to 15 per cent Service compris or service charge is included by law in France so tipping is not always expected.
(15) That report did not have as much impact on the industry or academy as I had hoped, but it did provide a guide for my own program of research on tipping. Consequently, some 10 years after that report, there is more empirical evidence on many of the issues it identified.
FESTIVE TIPPING Window-cleaners, bin men and milk men fall into the category of festive tipping for many.
Tipping got its start centuries ago in Europe, where British aristocrats tipped their servants for good deeds, according to Kerry Segrave's book Tipping: An American Social History of Gratuities.
The present field experiment took place in a privately owned local bar in the city of Spearfish, SD (population approximately 12,000) to determine whether the amount of clothing worn by a female bartender would affect the tipping behavior of customers.
The middle of the book presents multiple "conversations with tipped employees and employers." These interviews with waiters waitresses and restaurant owners offer some background about why people choose a tipping persona what it feels like to be "stiffed" by a customer the everyday life of a server and many other stories that provide background for the whole tipping issue.
Schwartz (1997) claims that the low correlation between tips and service quality refutes the argument that tipping is an efficient quality-control mechanism.
11-14, 2006 Gallup Lifestyle poll asked Americans what the appropriate percentage of a restaurant bill to leave as a tip is.aThe two most popular tipping amounts are 15%, named by 37% of Americans, and 20%, named by 34%.
Gladwell traces some fascinating case studies--Sesame Street, the drop in crime in New York City in the mid 1990s--and offers a number of smart suggestions about what conditions are typically met before a "tipping point," the moment when a trend becomes a phenomenon, when mere possibility becomes reality.
My $10 per-person/per-day thoughts on "mandatory" tipping is that cruise lines simply should add a reasonable amount to the price of the cruise and eliminate tipping altogether.