timing difference

Timing Difference

In accounting, the amount of time between the point at which an asset or transaction affects a company's finances for reporting purposes and the point at which it affects it for tax purposes. This is especially important in depreciation: tax depreciation and reporting depreciation are sometimes calculated differently.

timing difference

The time difference between the point at which a transaction affects items for financial reporting purposes and the point at which it affects the same items for tax purposes. For example, purchase of a fixed asset depreciated by an accelerated method for tax purposes, but by straight-line for reporting purposes, creates a timing difference for depreciation expense.
References in periodicals archive ?
Management said, "At the time of our fourth quarter earnings release we highlighted a possible timing difference between lost sales and associated margin in the first quarter 2019 and the reimbursement by our insurance carriers in a subsequent quarter.
The comparison also benefited from a timing difference between income tax expense and revenue reductions at Ameren Missouri related to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA).
Adjusting for the timing difference for the "Tom Joyner Fantastic Voyage," Reach Media's revenue increased 5.9% for the quarter, compared to the same period in 2013.
On our last cycles, we set materiality numbers for timing differences. For rollover effects within the audit cycle (e.g., 1998 adjustment reversing in 1999), we agreed on a number below which timing difference would not be pursued.
* Phase is the timing difference between the output and input sinusoids, expressed in degrees.
This difference is what is known as a timing difference.
But to exploit this intensity and timing difference, the sound's wavelength must be much smaller than the distance between the ears.
Muenchen recommended the withdrawal of the regulations, calling the issue a timing difference. Ms.
Therefore, the effect of making the election, with respect to taxable bonds, is a timing difference for ordinary income recognition.
Arguably, a change to the language of the regulations needs to be made to have the timing difference apply in the example.
Although technically a timing difference, many leases have such long terms that they create what amounts to a "permanent" difference between U.S.
Accordingly, the gain triggered on transfers of assets to a FASIT is effectively a timing difference; it reverses over time to zero.