Lag

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Lag

Payment of a financial obligation later than is expected or required, as in lead and lag. Also, the number of periods that an dependent variable in a regression model is "held back" in order to predict the dependent variable.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Lag

1. A late payment.

2. In a quantitative model, the length of time considered in the past that is used to predict a future variable.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison, the Fed has zero experience with the massive quantitative tightening program it has undertaken and no knowledge about the time lags associated with it.
The time lag levels of the detonator and the corresponding emulsion explosive weight for this blasting are presented in Table 2.
In calculating these time lags, two data points were selected for each approved drug.
Yet, as a method, it distinguishes the changes in entropy values at the time lags t, shown by light red horizontal stripes in (d).
Concerning one transaction, a trader in Lebanon wrote to his partner in Fustat: "Do whatever your propitious judgment suggests to you." Behind this simple statement is an understanding that time lags in communication, the vagaries of wind and tide, and the certainty of the unpredictable required a lot of ad hoc, on-the-spot decisions for which detailed formal contracts, drafted with an eye to potential litigation, could be a hindrance.
The switching over to digital will also cut back on time lags between the release of movies in metro areas and smaller towns.
Rather than being transparent, insurers often are considered "opaque" because some of their activities are not publicly disclosed or disclosed only with significant time lags. Insurance accounting rules don't always help to make the business more understandable to investors.
The second issue is that there are time lags between when the data are collected and when the allocations are available to states, so that the allocations may not reflect current labor market conditions.
To cover the range of possible incubation periods of cryptosporidiosis (19), we conducted this analysis for time lags between exposure and illness from 0 to 18 days, one lag at a time.
Average start time lags were between 0.06 and 0.11 minutes, while average end time lags ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 minutes among elements for chainsaw felling.
The world today has many historic time lags. These lags are insignificant in the context of the long history of mankind.