tier

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Tier

A group of securities according to company size or quality. For example, blue chip stocks may belong in one tier, while startup stocks belong in another. See also: Secondary stock, Credit rating.

tier

A grouping of securities, usually by company size or security quality. See also secondary stock.

tier

A row of townships extending east and west. See public land survey system.

References in periodicals archive ?
The GIC tiered networks are based on a common database of performance profiles and a specialty designation for individual physicians that was developed using pooled data from all of the GIC's health plans to maximize sample size and to eliminate potentially confusing and conflicting performance measurement.
Charging differential copayments across tiers is not the only mechanism through which a tiered physician network may influence consumer choice of physician.
CDP can also enable simple tiered storage schemes, allowing administrators to keep an active email archive online on SATA disk with an off-site copy of the archive.
Again, the key to a successful tiered backup storage model like this is ensuring that the data center can support multiple mobile media types, on a single platform if possible, to simplify data center management.
It provides storage managers with the means to categorize and prioritize business applications by the level of service they demand, including Recovery Time Objectives and Recovery Point Objectives for BC/DR planning, and then map those requirements to the appropriate class of storage using a tiered architecture.
SANs don't have to be massive to benefit from a tiered storage strategy.
Limiting your view of tiered storage to the SAN infrastructure ensures that LUNs of certain characteristics are "available" but misses the whole point of certifying that the right application actually receives its requested service in a compliant fashion.
Unstructured data drives up the need for tiered storage because its value tends to fall more quickly over time than does the value of structured data.
File-based tiered storage particularly benefits verticals with petabytes of file storage, such as geological explorations, medical MRI files, and massive genome studies in the life sciences.
The ILM model includes policies to determine which characteristics the data requires to optimally select primary, secondary and archival storage as three storage tiers are the most common tiered storage deployed.
Tiered storage solutions shouldn't introduce management complexities or operational overhead.
The process of evaluating and prioritizing the company's data using an ILM strategy leads to the obvious conclusion of a tiered storage architecture where data is stored based on requirements related to performance, availability and economics.