Tide

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Related to tides: neap tides, spring tides

Tide

In technical analysis, an informal term for a security's performance over a long period of time, usually over a year or more. Analysts look for cyclical behavior in a security to interpret the tide properly; that is, if a long-term bull market is observed with a bad trading day in a certain week, an analyst might view the short-term trend as moderately bearish without detracting from the long-term bullish tide. The term was coined by Robert Rhea. See also: Ripple, Wave.
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References in classic literature ?
But, to be sure the tide was high, and there might have been some footpints under water.
I called to Herbert and Startop to keep before the tide, that she might see us lying by for her, and I adjured Provis to sit quite still, wrapped in his cloak.
In the same moment, I saw the steersman of the galley lay his hand on his prisoner's shoulder, and saw that both boats were swinging round with the force of the tide, and saw that all hands on board the steamer were running forward quite frantically.
Presently a dark object was seen in it, bearing towards us on the tide. No man spoke, but the steersman held up his hand, and all softly backed water, and kept the boat straight and true before it.
We remained at the public-house until the tide turned, and then Magwitch was carried down to the galley and put on board.
It presently occurred to me that it was in vain to pretend to make a raft with the wind offshore; and that it was my business to be gone before the tide of flood began, otherwise I might not be able to reach the shore at all.
"King Tide" lacks a scientific definition, but rather is a term used to describe exceptionally high tides.
The oceanographer was the world's leading authority on predicting tides, based at Bidston Observatory.
"Everyone was sort of stumped, because according to conventional theory, those earthquakes should occur at high tides," explained seismologist and co-lead of the study Christopher Scholz.
The puzzle that has consumed Landau for the past several years is red tide. A few months ago, he talked about his findings at a seminar at USF Sarasota-Manatee that was presented in partnership with the Global Interdependence Center.
The tides deserve more attention in our science classes, as they demonstrate the power of gravity and the earth's rotation in a daily orchestrated performance that extends through the day, the sun and the moon flirting with each other while the seas watch.