Tide

(redirected from tides)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to tides: neap tides, spring tides

Tide

In technical analysis, an informal term for a security's performance over a long period of time, usually over a year or more. Analysts look for cyclical behavior in a security to interpret the tide properly; that is, if a long-term bull market is observed with a bad trading day in a certain week, an analyst might view the short-term trend as moderately bearish without detracting from the long-term bullish tide. The term was coined by Robert Rhea. See also: Ripple, Wave.
References in classic literature ?
We rigged up a single short mast and light sail, fastened planking down over the ballast to form a deck, worked her out into midstream with a couple of sweeps, and dropped our primitive stone anchor to await the turn of the tide that would bear us out to sea.
The dismal wind was muttering round the house, the tide was flapping at the shore, and I had a feeling that we were caged and threatened.
But, to be sure the tide was high, and there might have been some footpints under water.
I called to Herbert and Startop to keep before the tide, that she might see us lying by for her, and I adjured Provis to sit quite still, wrapped in his cloak.
In the same moment, I saw the steersman of the galley lay his hand on his prisoner's shoulder, and saw that both boats were swinging round with the force of the tide, and saw that all hands on board the steamer were running forward quite frantically.
Presently a dark object was seen in it, bearing towards us on the tide.
We remained at the public-house until the tide turned, and then Magwitch was carried down to the galley and put on board.
The tide had long since begun to rise, and, foot by foot, it drove me in toward the beach.
All that I could do was to wait till the tide was at the highest, keeping the raft with my oar like an anchor, to hold the side of it fast to the shore, near a flat piece of ground, which I expected the water would flow over; and so it did.
Then I called a council - that is to say in my thoughts - whether I should take back the raft; but this appeared impracticable: so I resolved to go as before, when the tide was down; and I did so, only that I stripped before I went from my hut, having nothing on but my chequered shirt, a pair of linen drawers, and a pair of pumps on my feet.
As for myself, it was no great harm, for I was near the shore; but as to my cargo, it was a great part of it lost, especially the iron, which I expected would have been of great use to me; however, when the tide was out, I got most of the pieces of the cable ashore, and some of the iron, though with infinite labour; for I was fain to dip for it into the water, a work which fatigued me very much.
It presently occurred to me that it was in vain to pretend to make a raft with the wind offshore; and that it was my business to be gone before the tide of flood began, otherwise I might not be able to reach the shore at all.