money

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Money

Currency and coin that are guaranteed as legal tender by the government, a regulatory agency or bank.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Money

A commodity, asset, or (most commonly) currency that may be exchanged for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government issues its own money and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. Money and the money supply are integral to determining interest rates, inflation, and especially economic growth. There is no uniform agreement as to what qualifies as money; some economists include more mediums of exchange than other economists. Every society throughout history has used some sort of money, even bartering economies traded for something perceived to be equivalent. See also: Money supply, Liquidity.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

money

A generally accepted medium for the exchange of goods and services, for measuring value, or for making payments. Many economists consider the amount of money and growth in the amount of money in an economy very influential in determining interest rates, inflation, and the level of economic activity. There is some disagreement among economists as to what types of things actually should be classified as money; for example, should balances in money market funds be included. See also money supply.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

money

an asset which is generally acceptable as a means of payment in the sale and purchase of products and other assets and for concluding borrowing and lending transactions. The use of money enables products and assets to be priced in terms of the monetary units of the country (pence and pounds in the UK, for example), and to be exchanged using money as a common medium of exchange rather than the bartering of one product against another. Money also acts as a store of value (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of products and assets, as for example in compiling the country's NATIONAL INCOME accounts). See MONEY SUPPLY, MONETARY POLICY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

money

an ASSET that is generally acceptable as a medium of exchange. Individual goods and services, and other physical assests, are ‘priced’ in terms of money and are exchanged using money as a common denominator rather than one GOOD, etc., being exchanged for another (as in BARTER). The use of money as a means of payment enables an economy to produce more output because it facilitates SPECIALIZATION in production and reduces the time spent by sellers and buyers in arranging exchanges. Other important functions of money are its use as a store of value or purchasing power (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments), a standard of deferred payment (money is used as an agreed measure of future receipts and payments in contracts) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of goods or services, e.g. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, over time). See LEGAL TENDER.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Fossil fuels destroy people's lives and jeopardise our future, and we need to stop the finance sector throwing money at them.
You can understand why Limerick are throwing money at big signings of late - they are desperate to get out of the First Division.
He could quite easily double pensioners' money by dropping out of the EU and saving billions of pounds, stop throwing money at Third World countries for crooked governments to feather their nests with, and stop fighting other people's battles.
It's time we got our priorities right and stop throwing money at dead ducks such that garden and theatre in South Wales
We need to invest in good working practices and stop throwing money at everything that is not working.
West Ham just seem to be throwing money at players to try to get noticed.
I realise that doing good and making a difference is not just about throwing money at problems; but Gates and Buffett are experts at manipulating resources to good effect; and, although creating wealth is very different from spending it, this new partnership is terrific news for humanity.
Owton just goes to prove that throwing money at the problem is not enough.
Otherwise, I am sure the council would be throwing money at it left, right and centre.
Another feature of this under-performance is the perception that you can buy rapid improvement by throwing money at the problem....
"It seems this council wants to go back to old Labour ways, throwing money at a problem in the hope it will go away.''