money

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Money

Currency and coin that are guaranteed as legal tender by the government, a regulatory agency or bank.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Money

A commodity, asset, or (most commonly) currency that may be exchanged for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government issues its own money and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. Money and the money supply are integral to determining interest rates, inflation, and especially economic growth. There is no uniform agreement as to what qualifies as money; some economists include more mediums of exchange than other economists. Every society throughout history has used some sort of money, even bartering economies traded for something perceived to be equivalent. See also: Money supply, Liquidity.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

money

A generally accepted medium for the exchange of goods and services, for measuring value, or for making payments. Many economists consider the amount of money and growth in the amount of money in an economy very influential in determining interest rates, inflation, and the level of economic activity. There is some disagreement among economists as to what types of things actually should be classified as money; for example, should balances in money market funds be included. See also money supply.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

money

an asset which is generally acceptable as a means of payment in the sale and purchase of products and other assets and for concluding borrowing and lending transactions. The use of money enables products and assets to be priced in terms of the monetary units of the country (pence and pounds in the UK, for example), and to be exchanged using money as a common medium of exchange rather than the bartering of one product against another. Money also acts as a store of value (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of products and assets, as for example in compiling the country's NATIONAL INCOME accounts). See MONEY SUPPLY, MONETARY POLICY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

money

an ASSET that is generally acceptable as a medium of exchange. Individual goods and services, and other physical assests, are ‘priced’ in terms of money and are exchanged using money as a common denominator rather than one GOOD, etc., being exchanged for another (as in BARTER). The use of money as a means of payment enables an economy to produce more output because it facilitates SPECIALIZATION in production and reduces the time spent by sellers and buyers in arranging exchanges. Other important functions of money are its use as a store of value or purchasing power (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments), a standard of deferred payment (money is used as an agreed measure of future receipts and payments in contracts) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of goods or services, e.g. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, over time). See LEGAL TENDER.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps it is only part of the rationalisation process, but, just as anyone with a credit card could see that the way the banks were throwing money around was bound to end in tears, they can also see that, when the cash dries up, things will slow down and no amount of "business as usual" sound-bites will avert a recession.
Perhaps by then we will have seen a return to sensible lending policies on the part of banks which have been throwing money around in prodigious quantities without inquiring too much about the ability of borrowers to keep repaying it.
They cast glances towards Upton Park, where Eggert Magnusson is throwing money around like it is printed by Monopoly, towards St Andrews, where Birmingham City have been the subject of takeover talk and towards Manchester City, who could soon have new owners.
``I think reality has finally sunk in at Cardiff, they are realising that they can no more keep throwing money around.
He's a good man and a good manager and you can be sure he won't be throwing money around on players.
It's not because I like throwing money around. We only think about the player and you get the price and you have to accept it or not."
Psychologist Elizabeth Dunn, left, says buying experiences rather than material items is a good way to use your money to boost happiness | Rather than throwing money around, psychologists Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton claim in their new book, above, that if we really want to be happy, we should change how we spend the money that we do have
If you look at a graph of UK real debt as a percentage of GDP throughout the New Labour years, it started of reasonably stable until Gordon Brown, with the help of Mr Balls, decided to do the dirty on us by throwing money around with their immigration, benefit, and taxpayer-funded government jobs policies.
Isn't throwing money around like that for no return swindling shareholders?
It is great that we are going to host this spectacle in 2012, but we should not lose sight of the fact that these games are going to cost billions at exactly the time when our economic growth has come to a standstill and we really can't afford to be throwing money around.
'Customers are not throwing money around, they're looking for value,' he said.
A source said yesterday: "It was the usual gangster fair - gougers wearing Rolexes throwing money around like they owned the place.