money

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Money

Currency and coin that are guaranteed as legal tender by the government, a regulatory agency or bank.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Money

A commodity, asset, or (most commonly) currency that may be exchanged for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government issues its own money and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. Money and the money supply are integral to determining interest rates, inflation, and especially economic growth. There is no uniform agreement as to what qualifies as money; some economists include more mediums of exchange than other economists. Every society throughout history has used some sort of money, even bartering economies traded for something perceived to be equivalent. See also: Money supply, Liquidity.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

money

A generally accepted medium for the exchange of goods and services, for measuring value, or for making payments. Many economists consider the amount of money and growth in the amount of money in an economy very influential in determining interest rates, inflation, and the level of economic activity. There is some disagreement among economists as to what types of things actually should be classified as money; for example, should balances in money market funds be included. See also money supply.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

money

an asset which is generally acceptable as a means of payment in the sale and purchase of products and other assets and for concluding borrowing and lending transactions. The use of money enables products and assets to be priced in terms of the monetary units of the country (pence and pounds in the UK, for example), and to be exchanged using money as a common medium of exchange rather than the bartering of one product against another. Money also acts as a store of value (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of products and assets, as for example in compiling the country's NATIONAL INCOME accounts). See MONEY SUPPLY, MONETARY POLICY.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

money

an ASSET that is generally acceptable as a medium of exchange. Individual goods and services, and other physical assests, are ‘priced’ in terms of money and are exchanged using money as a common denominator rather than one GOOD, etc., being exchanged for another (as in BARTER). The use of money as a means of payment enables an economy to produce more output because it facilitates SPECIALIZATION in production and reduces the time spent by sellers and buyers in arranging exchanges. Other important functions of money are its use as a store of value or purchasing power (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments), a standard of deferred payment (money is used as an agreed measure of future receipts and payments in contracts) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of goods or services, e.g. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, over time). See LEGAL TENDER.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They cannot throw money around like confetti and that's why we've lost a rump of players recently to the Championship.
Once again, though, we find ourselves in the middle of another Everton pre-season and nerves are starting to become frayed in certain quarters, as the usual suspects - aided and abetted by Sunderland - try to throw money around as if it was going out of fashion.
"It's just marketing conditions and I know ESPN people pretty well - they don't throw money around." The SPL knocked back a deal from Sky in favour of Setanta seven years ago and Hearn knows it was a mistake in hindsight - same as with the Football League.
Souness has put a large slice of his personal cash into the pounds 20m pot and is not the type to throw money around unless he believes that the project can be a success.
Birmingham's wage bill has been significantly reduced in recent months and, while the club remains in profit, there is no desire to throw money around like they did two or three years ago.
Putting pounds 100 on a horse is not an extravagance, nor is it in any way an indication of having the wherewithal to throw money around. It is an investment, and often a very shrewd one.
"It's not that they throw money around. They make incredibly strategic choices," Kliot says.