person

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person

Legally, any natural or artificial person, which would include corporations, partnerships, associations, and limited liability companies. If it is important to distinguish among the “persons” who may do something or who are prohibited from doing something, relevant contracts, leases, or statutes will usually define the term.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the third person singular number (he, she, it), all other persons and numbers take the form of the verb without the s or es: 18) They speak good English.
The team measured brain activity during the experiments and found that the people referring to themselves in the third person reacted less emotionally immediately after seeing those negative images or remembering those negative memories - without the subjects having to consciously control their emotions on a cognitive level.
The Perceived Impact of the Mass Media: Reconsidering the Third Person Effect.
Brosius and Engel (1996) found when the third person was described as psychologically close, the difference between effect estimates for the self and others was smaller than when others were described as psychologically distant.
Eidos plc (NASDAQ:EIDSY), a publisher and developer of entertainment software, has incorporated both first and third person playable points of view for gamers in the upcoming Spring 2004 release of Thief: Deadly Shadows.
VWW: The third person. Although it's hard in the first person, too.
An Assembly spokesman said, ``There might be a letter from us which might refer to a third person. The third person could be someone like Lesley McCarthy or someone from the Durham Road campaign (in Newport).''
Let us return to the traditional blessing formula: "Barukh attah Adonai, elohenu melekh ha-olam, asher..." "Blessed be You, O Lord our God, sovereign of the universe, who...." Those praying address God in the second person as "You O Lord." This Lord is then referred to in the third person as the sovereign of the universe who does such-and-such, for example "who commanded us to do something" or "who creates the fruit of the vine." Critics have focused on two problems in this formula--grammatical mixture and gender--and tried to amend it with two radically different solutions.