Fit

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Fit

The matching of the investor's requirements and needs such as risk tolerance and growth potential preference with a specific investment. Also, how well or how poorly a regression line represents the data points it is based on. A good ‘fit’ indicates a high correlation coefficient.

Fit

To meet the needs of an investor or portfolio. That is, a security fits a portfolio if it has the acceptable amount of risk, return, meets the investor's ethical preferences, and so forth.

fit

A condition in which a security fulfills an investor's portfolio needs. For example, an investor may select a new municipal bond because that bond's maturity makes it a good fit in the investor's portfolio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Everybody is entitled to conduct their business in whatever manner they think fit.
These are quite clearly directives "to be obeyed" and in no way are they guidelines, nor do they allow anyone discretion to use them as they think fit.
Patsy, who has a son, James, 10, from her marriage to Simple Minds singer Jim Kerr, and Lennon, three, from her marriage to Liam Gallagher, added: "I think Fit Mothers is really exciting.
a) to make the reinstatement of such licence or permit at the expiry of any period of suspension subject to the licence holder having complied with and/or continuing to comply with such requirements or conditions as they think fit.
Mr Justice Pumfrey agreed to vary the terms of the will so that Earl Percy does not receive the income or lump sum until he is 25 or earlier in smaller amounts as the trustees think fit.
He said: "I think FIT is a great initiative because it offers people, who would otherwise not have a chance, to learn the skills necessary to get a job in the changing economy.
And ward sisters will have pounds 5,000 each to spend as they think fit.
I know which option I think fits that bill, but will anyone have the courage to grasp the nettle?
The New York Times' coverage of Congressional antics related to the Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) legislation has ignored so many critical aspects of the bill that it might be time for the "paper of record" to change its motto from "All the news that's fit to print" to "All the news we think fits, we print".
Ask them to think of 20/30 words they think describe the book, its genre and characters and then encourage them to create a word cloud in a shape they think fits it.