agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, several strategies are being developed using microRNA expression profiles as a part of diagnostic approaches within oncology in hope of improving prognostic accuracy and therapeutic agent selection.
Using RNA strands, researchers at Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Ind., have been able to construct nanoscale delivery vehicles capable of carrying anti-cancer therapeutic agents directly to infected cells.
Although small numbers of patients are involved at this stage of drug development, there are significant concerns associated with exposing salvage patients to a potentially useful, albeit investigational, therapeutic agent. For one, exposure to suboptimal doses of a single agent might allow resistance to develop, thus eliminating any hope of using the agent in future therapy.
What do I consider the best therapeutic agent? Many recognize the need for holistic medicine, for inner healing and wholeness as well as `cures'.
Still, there is much we do not know about this substance, and we are in the infancy phase of its use as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent. Ongoing research is helping to clarify some of the less well understood biochemical aspects of botulinum toxin, as well as addressing the problems we face in using it as a chemical denervator.
patent covering the use of any therapeutic means (including a laser, radiofrequency energy or the injection of a therapeutic agent) in the heart which is synchronized with the patient's ECG.
Aspirin, in appropriate dosages, has been identified as a valuable therapeutic agent in reducing the risk of a first myocardial infarction, or heart attack, at least in men over 50 years of age with no symptoms of the disease.
Data from compassionate use of I-131 1095 indicates it was well tolerated and demonstrated markedly reduced PSA levels and bone pain in a group of heavily-pretreated advanced prostate cancer patients following a single cycle of treatment.1 "We are pleased, following our discussions with FDA, to move this important therapeutic agent into a phase 2 study in combination with enzalutamide in chemo-naive patients with mCRPC," stated Vivien Wong, Ph.D., Executive Vice President Development at Progenics.
Patent and Trademark Office for patent application 12/418,170 pertaining to a "Spinal Platform and Method for Delivering a Therapeutic Agent to a Spinal Cord Target."
"The human body has been widely used as a therapeutic agent with the most popular treatments involving flesh, bone or blood," the Daily Mail quoted the author as saying.
"This collaboration will provide us the opportunity to work with Kringle Pharma on an important new potential cancer therapeutic agent."