theory of international trade

theory of international trade

the body of theory concerned with the determinants of, and the gains to be obtained from, INTERNATIONAL TRADE and SPECIALIZATION. The theory examines the way in which differences between countries in terms of supply costs and demand structures affect the level, product and area composition of international trade, and the level and distribution of the GAINS FROM TRADE. See COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE, HECKSCHER-OHLIN FACTOR PROPORTIONS THEORY, PREFERENCE SIMILARITY THEORY, PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE THEORY, TECHNOLOGICAL GAP THEORY, EDGEWORTH BOX.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Pure Theory of International Trade: A Survey".
Meanwhile, Jacob Viner (1950) introduced the welfare variable into the theory of international trade in general and mainly into the theory of customs unions.
This implies that the modern theory of international trade expected to give the solutions of the following fundamental questions.
The second and third parts of the book are devoted to the chronological overview of the development of approaches to the issues of foreign trade from mercantilism, through the neoclassical theory of international trade to the present.
The dominant theory of international trade relationships was David Ricardo's theory of "comparative advantage." It advocated that each country should produce what it had an economic advantage in producing and exchange the surplus with other countries who would do the same.
Studies in the Theory of International Trade. New York: Harper and Brothers Publishers.
It is a standard demonstration in the theory of international trade that a tariff nearly always costs consumers more than what producers and taxpayers gain.
The paper presents (a) Standard Theory of International Trade, (b) Elasticity Approach, (c) Keynesian Absorption Approach, and (d) Monetary Approach.
Criticizing orthodox neoclassical theory of international trade as stressing static comparative cost advantage (the philosophical and ideological basis of the "Washington Consensus" and the activities of the WTO) without taking into account significant factors relevant to the case of developing countries that require greater state involvement to address rather than relying on market forces alone, this volume presents an alternative approach to development.
reprinted in AEA Readings in the Theory of International Trade, Philadelphia, Blakiston, 1949, 272-300.
The Ricardian theory of international trade envisages that the differential in technologies across countries determines the trans national trade pattern.
A number of pathbreaking articles had established his reputation as an economic theorist, his Studies in the Theory of International Trade had just been published, and he had experience as a policy adviser to the League of Nations and US Treasury among other organisations.