testament


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testament

Originally, an instrument that provided for the disposition of personal property after death.Today,it is simply another word for a will,as in “last will and testament.”

References in periodicals archive ?
In a slightly revision of his June 2017 PhD dissertation in theology at Free University Amsterdam, Kamphuis presents an exegetical treatise of New Testament conjectural criticism by Holwerda (1805-86).
Testament will be a band living in two eras as it arrives in Worcester April 18 for its headlining show as part of the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival.
There was solid ground for the Bender position that sixteenth-century Anabaptists were New Testament Christians.
The Testament of Ivan the Terrible is not one of the major sources on the history of the reign, if for no other reason than its lack of impact on the succession.
The studies have been revised and augmented to reflect the status of questions concerning the text of the New Testament 20 years after the first edition.
For the New Testament writers, the Old Testament was holy scripture.
Caption: The New Testament in Dhimba (left) and Khoikhoigowab (right) becomes available this weekend and next weekend.
In academic and dialogical circles there was a marked increase of using "The Hebrew Bible" instead of "The Old Testament." The word "old," it was suggested, alluded to something passe, outmoded, not as good as "new," and it appeared to reflect the widely used theology of super-sessionism or dispensationalism, at first almost universally used by Christians but recently used mostly by evangelical or fundamentalist Christians.
With this methodological foundation in place, the main sections of the book illustrate the light Rabbinic literature--both law (Halakhah) and lore (Aggadah)--sheds on New Testament writings.
Is it hiding the truth about the Third Testament? Big, secretive, powerful organizations, whether they be the Catholic Church, the giant corporation, or the Masons, are wonderful elements to add to a movie.
The main purpose of this book is to situate the Copenhagen school's contribution to the study of ancient Israelite history within the past two centuries of scholarship on the theology of the Old Testament. For the past three decades the Copenhagen school, scholars from the University of Copenhagen and Sheffield University, have argued that the Old Testament texts were composed at a very late date in the first millennium B.C.E., somewhere during the fourth-second centuries (p.
Haskins, Jr., argues that the provisions in Leviticus I quoted in my November 15 letter should somehow be read as applicable only to the ancient Jews, but that since homosexuality is also condemned in "the age of grace," i.e., the New Testament, therefore, "it is not hypocritical to rely on the Bible's proscriptions of homosexuality."