tenure

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tenure

A time period,as in the tenure of a lease.

References in periodicals archive ?
If true, the average tenured professor views only progressive undergraduates, not conservative ones, as future colleagues.
Each of these reasons can make it still difficult to remove a tenured faculty member (Burton, 1986).
Supreme Court held that tenured teachers could not lose their rights to a continuing contract through a repeal of the state's tenure statute.
Inadequate tenured teachers who are employed full time are often shipped about between the different schools in the district year after year in the hope that a new school will make them a better teacher.
higher education job market, a bird's-eye view of experiences and perceptions among faculty currently in tenure-track or tenured positions is needed.
Previously, tenured teachers who lost their positions because of school changes, such as declining enrollment or program elimination, were guaranteed another position at another school in their district.
Terminating tenured professors, by contrast, is extremely difficult, whether at the UO or other universities.
NAWL does point out that its report found that the percentage of women in corporate general counsel positions and law school tenured faculty have fared better than women equity partners in law firms.
All three faculty members were originally granted tenure at TSC and became tenured faculty members at UTB when the institutions merged in 1992.
As an exciting historic shift occurs at our university, tenured status enables me to take risks in advocating for infrastructure changes and equitable practices.
On 1st October 2013, while taking notice of the Petitioner's main grievance, Justice Siddiqui had directed the Vice Chancellor "to pass some appropriate and speaking order with regard to the appointment of Petitioner as Tenured Associate Professor within one week on the receipt of instant order and till then the process for the selection of Professor at SPIR may not commence."
Over the course of a two-year state budget, this could save the University System $13 million, and likely even more, as we expect that the actual figure for the net costs of sabbaticals is substantially greater than our cautious estimate, especially considering that the average compensation package of a tenured professor has increased from $104,509 in 2004 to nearly $140,000 today.