tenure


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tenure

A time period,as in the tenure of a lease.

References in classic literature ?
The tenure by which the judges are to hold their places, is, as it unquestionably ought to be, that of good behavior.
Here and there on the coasts, living by most precarious tenure, was a sprinkling of missionaries, traders, bˆche-de-mer fishers, and whaleship deserters.
Even the sick chamber seemed to be retained, on the uncertain tenure of Mr Quilp's favour.
Notwithstanding my inability to settle to anything - which I hope arose out of the restless and incomplete tenure on which I held my means - I had a taste for reading, and read regularly so many hours a day.
Colleges' family-friendly policies that are designed to give professors some leeway as they try to attain tenure are proving to be detrimental to women even as they are a boon to men.
On other hand, Higher Education Commission (HEC) has directed all public sector universities to be watchful vis-AA -vis faculty members serving on tenure track and still occupying administrative posts.
Tenure corrupts, enervates, and dulls higher education.
Texas Tech University business professor James Wetherbe's fight against tenure began as a quiet, personal stance.
Synopsis: The highest performing employees have long tenure and high engagement, and are in jobs that align with their innate talents.
Summary: For seven to 60 days tenure, the interest rate has been reduced to
Following is an excerpt from the report's observations made on the seventh of the hot topics--ensuring appropriate board composition in light of increasing focus on director tenure and diversity.