Tenement

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Tenement

An apartment building, especially a shoddy or poorly maintained one. A tenement may only meet the minimum standards for the owner to rent its units legally.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, in the active narration of day-to-day of life in a tenement house located a few blocks away from the Presidential House, La casa de vecindad turns the space and practices of the poor into a means of contestation.
--(1878c) "Urban Housing III: Use of Frontage, Width of Streets-the Tenement Houses Possible on Smaller Lots." American Architect and Building News, 18 May: 125.
a grid of tenement houses in rows of concrete block,
Tiedeman, "Suppression of Vice: How Far a Proper and Efficient Function of Popular Government," Brief 3 (1900): 17-28; "Disorderly Tenement Houses," 26 March 1901, New York Times, card 535, vol.
The knowledge that the disease of workers -- who sewed clothes in their filthy tenement houses or who processed food -- could spread to decent, clean, and respectable citizens gave society cause to worry.
His works depict childhood and youth in the tenement houses of the east side of Oslo, where he grew up.
His extensive report included case histories of individual contractors and individual tenement houses, as well as medical evidence of the deleterious effects of tobacco, expecially on pregnant women and their chances for healthy births.
A mural by local graffiti artist Alex Croft featuring rows of tenement houses draws a constant stream of tourists to the steeply sloping Graham Street in downtown Central district.
13 local governments submitted an application to SA KredEx for the construction and renovation of tenement houses. In total, ten buildings accommodate social housing adaptations, for example for people with special needs, elderly people or substitute homes.
Grossly overcrowded tenement houses were breeding grounds of hardship, hunger and disease.
The parishioners were mostly poor, with many of them living in area tenement houses actually owned by the church.