Tenement

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Tenement

An apartment building, especially a shoddy or poorly maintained one. A tenement may only meet the minimum standards for the owner to rent its units legally.
References in periodicals archive ?
By making a tenement house the protagonist of his novel, Osorio seeks to reveal the politics of space on which the nation is built, particularly as it takes shape in Bogota.
(53.) William John Freyer, The tenement house law of the city of New York, with headings, paragraphs, marginal notes and full indexes, (New York: The Record and guide, 1901), 38, Section 100 and p.
The bourgeois culture, which has introduced to the Polish experience the life (also fictional) in a tenement house so late and for such a short period of time, has soon found an epilogue in the form of a brick torn from a building wall and the (anti-)aesthetics of a post-war ruin.
I hereby suggest that this be one of the first problems we handle, and, if possible, we secure such legislation as will compel every person or corporation * who shall in the future erect a tenement house to connect each room with an individual ventilating flue, to be not less than 8 in.
Dolkart (historic preservation, Columbia U.) recounts the life of a building at 97 Orchard Street, a typical tenement house in New York City that later became the site for the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in 1988.
The California state capitol building in Sacramento was transformed one morning in January into a tenement house strung with laundry lines.
But when Page tells us that "New York originated the idea of a tenement house 'problem,'" he makes the provocative point that there is nothing inherently problematic about poor neighborhoods.
You can also take guided tours of an 1863 tenement house, where museum staffers explain the stories of the families who lived here.
Congested living conditions were further exacerbated by the development of the tenement house. Conditions here were ideal for the spread of infectious disease and slum dwellers were ravaged by epidemics of typhus, scarlet fever, smallpox, and typhoid.
In Eileen Boris's essay on tenement house cigarmaking, female workers have some presence, but the burden of her argument is to show how notions of respectable manliness and the family wage drove the union's legislative campaign to prohibit tenement house cigar production in New York State.
He was instrumental in the establishment of the Tenement House Commission of 1884, arranged for trained nurses to visit the poor, argued for parks and playgrounds in poor areas, and opposed child labor.
In 1884 Adler helped to establish the first Tenement House Commission; he arranged for trained nurses to visit the poor, lobbied for parks and playgrounds in depressed urban areas, and served for a time as chairman of the National Child Labor Committee.