tender

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Tender

To offer for delivery against futures.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Tender

1. To agree to take an offer.

2. To bid for U.S. Treasury securities.

3. To settle.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

tender

To offer a security for sale to a party that is making an offer to buy it. For example, a stockholder may decide to tender shares to the issuing firm as part of the company's buyback. See also hedged tender.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

tender

  1. an invitation from a buyer who requires particular goods or services to prospective suppliers of those products to put in competing price bids. The buyer will usually detail the precise specifications of the product, and will make a final decision about which supplier's bid to accept on the basis of comparative price and how well bids match up to the stated requirements. See QUOTATION, definition 1.
  2. a means of making a SHARE ISSUE by offering shares to the general public, who are invited to make a bid for shares, subject to a minimum bid price. The issue price of the shares is determined by averaging out the bid prices offered by prospective purchasers. Anyone making a bid which is below the final issue price will not be offered any shares, whilst those making a bid at or above the price will be allotted shares in full at the final price.

    Tenders may be similarly used to sell other financial securities such as TREASURY BILLS.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

tender

  1. an invitation from a buyer who requires particular goods or services to prospective suppliers of those products to put in competing price bids. See COMPETITIVE TENDERING.
  2. a means of making a SHARE ISSUE by offering shares to the general public who are invited to make a bid for shares, subject to a minimum bid price. The issue price of the shares is determined by averaging out the bid prices offered by prospective purchasers. Anyone making a bid that is below the final issue price will not be offered any shares, while those making a bid at or above the issue price will be allotted shares in full at the final price.
Tenders may be similarly used to sell other financial securities such as TREASURY BILLS.

See TENDER ISSUE.

Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

tender

An offer to perform a contract,with the present ability to do so.The term is important when parties dispute the amount due on a debt. Usually, the debtor tenders payment in full, but the payment is refused by the creditor because of an assertion that more is due and the creditor will not accept a partial payment. Because there was a tender, if it is later determined the debtor's calculations were accurate, the debtor will owe no additional interest, costs, fees, or expenses.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The second contrasts three types of saints the author calls "popular," "local," and "official." Here Vauchez argues that ordinary people in the later Middle Ages tended to revere as martyrs individuals (often children) who were unjustly murdered in horrible circumstances, but that there was no clerical support for such cult.
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