high-technology stock

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High-Technology Stock

A stock in a company that sells products involving sophisticated technology. Commonly, high-technology companies deal in electronics, computers, and scientific research. Investing in high-technology stocks is high risk because the market is stiffly competitive, but it may yield a high return, particularly if a technology becomes very popular. This was the case in the 1990s when the Internet became a part of daily life. Many high-technology stocks trade on NASDAQ. See also: Dot-com bubble.

high-technology stock

The stock of a company that is involved in sophisticated technology, such as electronics, computer software, robotics, or life sciences companies. High-technology stock often offers large potential gains but tends to be quite risky because of intense competition and uncertain success.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the last three days of trading, key tech stocks such as FaceBook, Apple, Amazon, Google, and Netflix have dipped in value, following several years of unrelenting growth.
Consequently, Japanese shares have been hobbled by the successive downgrades in tech stocks.
Software group Sage, the only remaining tech stock in the Footsie, fell 6.
Dealers said tech stocks were boosted by news of better-than-expected results from Hewlett Packard in the United States.
Although retail investors are nervous and shying away from investing in high-tech stocks, institutional investors don't want to be left out when the tech stocks start accumulation," Ketchen adds.
based ReplayTV first filed for its IPO, tech stocks still were booming.
Geary enlisted the adviser and ended up with several portfolios, including a group of high tech stocks earning about 25-30 percent a year.
More than 90 internet companies are planning to raise money through initial public offerings of stock over the following six weeks in a litmus test of Wall Street's appetite for high tech stocks.
Tech stocks have vaulted to unprecedented heights on the strength of their company's innovation.
Investors hungry for tech stocks pushed the company's share price up more than 1,000 percent in a year from 1999 to 2000.
Led by banking and tech stocks, the FTSE 100 Index fell 36.