high-technology stock

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High-Technology Stock

A stock in a company that sells products involving sophisticated technology. Commonly, high-technology companies deal in electronics, computers, and scientific research. Investing in high-technology stocks is high risk because the market is stiffly competitive, but it may yield a high return, particularly if a technology becomes very popular. This was the case in the 1990s when the Internet became a part of daily life. Many high-technology stocks trade on NASDAQ. See also: Dot-com bubble.

high-technology stock

The stock of a company that is involved in sophisticated technology, such as electronics, computer software, robotics, or life sciences companies. High-technology stock often offers large potential gains but tends to be quite risky because of intense competition and uncertain success.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tech stocks were boosted by Twitter's 3.5 percent gain, which put the social messaging platform up 55 percent since the beginning of 2018.
News of Dell Inc's plans to buy information technology company Perot Systems Corp helped to lift some tech stocks, but failed to raise the broader market.
almost EUR750,000 worth of shares - until tech stocks crashed.
Throughout the late 1990s and the early part of this decade, SDI navigated an equities market biased toward tech stocks and a steel marketplace that kept a low ceiling on the prices the company could get for its finished steel.
The performance of Japanese tech stocks has been even worse, despite a digital consumer electronics boom that helped to support stock prices in 2004.
"The past year was tough on tech stocks because corporations were cautious about spending due to the soft patches in the economy.
("Oh, if only I had sold my tech stocks at the high!") But the underlying forces that drive us toward innovation--cost savings, productivity, quality of life--keep churning along.
When tech stocks were peaking and everyone was investing like crazy in the late 1990s, only 53 condominiums were listed; while eight months ago, as stocks plummeted, one could choose from 258 Siesta Key condo listings.
Again, the CPA can help get them back on course by stating an obvious but often overlooked truth--namely, that there is no profit in following the herd when the herd is chasing glitzy tech stocks with sky-high price-earnings multiples.
Investors who have been burned once on an impulse investment (e.g., an overconcentration in tech stocks in the late 1990's) are often prone to make another "bet it all" impulse investment in a vain attempt to make up their lost ground in one fell swoop.
Today, new buyers of tech stocks cannot count on huge rises in share price.