Tariff Barrier

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Tariff Barrier

A tariff designed to make imports more expensive than domestically produced products. That is, a tariff barrier is a tax imposed upon imports to protect local industries and companies. Critics, notably the WTO, have criticized tariff barriers because they believe they discourage international trade and because they may have net negative effects on the economy in the long run. However, proponents of tariff barriers argue that they can force countries to develop their own domestic industries. See also: Import substitution industrialization, Free trade.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A few years ago, he overrode President Ahmadi-nejad, who had lowered the tariff on foreign cars to punish Iranian automakers for hiding behind high tariff walls to produce shoddy products.
Tariff walls protect nonprofitable industries and weaken dynamic profitable ones.
In fact, the Asean will be bringing down tariff walls to zero or practically zero for almost all products grown or manufactured in the region.
The development of an industry in a captive market and under tariff walls is no more possible.
He noted that instead of hiding behind high tariff walls the agriculture sector needed to focus on improving its competitiveness.
someone who believes that nation states can best survive in a wider trading group that has a common identity forged by strong tariff walls.
In response to the collapse of demand in 1929, it erected high tariff walls. Sheltered from foreign competition, industry grew fat and lazy.
So in a post-Doha world, these countries could protect their leaf (and associated manufacturing) industries with higher tariff walls, while having often free access to overseas markets--global tobacco companies will doubtless take note.
Dr.Hafeez Pasha said the report prepared by MHDC suggests that the export encourages South Asian countries to protect their local industries behind tariff walls, thereby narrowing the scope for intra-regional exports.
First, the innocent one: the Chinese government may have been legitimately protecting infant automobile or computing industries (both high tariff products), nurturing them behind tariff walls regardless of the short-run losses in revenue.
Then tariff walls were so high that the duty on anything from straight pins to automobiles meant nothing got into the country.