Issue

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Issue

A particular financial asset.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Issue

A set of securities that a company or government offers for sale. That is, when a company sells stocks or bonds to the public (or offers them for private placement) the collection of stocks or bonds is said to be an issue. If the company or government is selling a set for the first time, it is said to be making a new issue. Typically, issues of securities may be bought and sold on the open market.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

issue

A particular grouping of an organization's securities. For example, General Motors has a number of different issues of preferred stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

issue

To sell securities in the primary market. For example, in late 1996, Florida Panthers Holdings, Inc., owner of the NHL hockey team, issued 2,700,000 Class A shares of common stock at a price of $10 per share.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Issue.

When a corporation offers a stock or bond for sale, or a government offers a bond, the security is known as an issue, and the company or government is the issuer.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking issue with other statements of said council such as the one on Ecumenism;
In taking issue with many of the claims put forward in The Real Shakespeare, this reviewer is simply revealed as part of the cover-up.
In taking issue with some influential contemporary critical perspectives - notably Stanley Fish's - Bamborough argues persuasively that Burton was principally a scholar attempting an encyclopedic comprehensiveness at a time when such inclusiveness was no longer possible.