Tag Line

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Tag Line

In marketing, a brief phrase used in advertising a product. It is intended to embed itself in the memories of members of the target audience in order to entice them to buy the product. For example, the tag line for a mousetrap company may be "No rodent escapes."
References in periodicals archive ?
And in tagline development, as in Shakespeare's play, Polonius must be dispatched.
Von der Esch says tourism officials knew that there wasn't enough space on a billboard to get in all the adjectives about the state of Utah, and that a slogan or tagline needed to be created that could extol the state's virtues quickly and succinctly.
The new logo features a clean and fresh image, encompassing Sysco's name, logo and tagline in one element.
When this is accomplished, the tagline serves as a clincher for the argument to buy from that company.
Cone: "You're in good hands." [Allstate.] "A diamond is forever." [De Beers.] "The ultimate driving machine." [BMW.] That's the only tagline in the auto industry that anyone has any recognition of today--and it's been around almost 40 years.
Measure opponents said Monday that they plan to flip the tagline so that the ad now declares that it is paid for by Reynolds American and authorized by Oregonians Against the Blank Check.
Be Heard is more than a tagline: It's how we live within IABC.
The logo design and tagline were developed to capture mushrooms' many positive attributes, from freshness and unique flavor to nutrition and versatility, in language that resonates with consumers, said Jurgensmeyer, adding that the new tagline scored highest for believability, recall, and ability to motivate purchase after extensive qualitative and quantitative consumer research and testing.
The signature "X," with one leg longer than the other, and the logo aren't changing; the event announced to the public a new tagline and a new focus on visibility.
"The tagline for AVICTA Complete Pak, Think out of the box, was suggested by our Technical Manager, Dr.
So now Inch, whose tagline appears on buildings across the North East, has been afforded an exhibition in Ouseburn.
But then, a new tagline started appearing in the e-mails of Howard Dean, Ted Kennedy, Paul Hackett, Wesley Clark, and several others: "Enough is enough." Whether it referred to Republican rule or cognitive linguism, the guerrilla tagline caught fire ...