synergy

(redirected from synergies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Synergy

Describes a combination whose value is greater than the sum of the separate individual parts.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Synergy

The financial benefit (or, more rarely, detriment) two companies may derive from a merger or acquisition. For example, two companies that merge may be able to produce more revenue than either one could produce independently by combining the most efficient processes each brings to the merger. Synergy may also refer to the cost reduction a merger brings about by eliminating or streamlining redundant processes. Synergy usually has a positive connotation, but one also occasionally hears of negative synergy, such as when the management teams of newly merged corporations do not work well with each other.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

synergy

An increase in the value of assets as a result of their combination. Expected synergy is the justification behind most business mergers. For example, General Motors purchased Electronic Data Systems in 1984 with the expectation that considerable synergy would result.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

synergy

the phenomenon whereby the overall return on a firm's resources is greater than the sum of its parts (the so-called ‘2 + 2 = 5 or more effect’). Synergy often results from the exploitation of complementary activities or from the carry over of management capabilities, synchronizing individual, group or organizational activities in a way which achieves a better result than any of the activities by themselves: for example, in the case of a MERGER, one firm may have a strong production organization, while the other excels in marketing; joining the two can make the combined firm more effective overall. See DIVERSIFICATION.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

synergy

see DIVERSIFICATION.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Stewart Early, only 61% of all mergers achieve 90% or more of the expected cost synergies. (3) In most cases, the typical sources of estimation errors were the underestimation of one-time costs for implementation, inability to ground estimates in bottom-up analyses, and failure to verify management estimates against previous transactions.
For each subject, the nEMG data were separated into patterns of synergies and muscle weightings using an NNMF algorithm [12].
In the third phase, to test the generalizability of the synergies over a broad range of postures, subjects were also asked to imitate 36 (10 numbers and 26 alphabet letters) American sign language (ASL) postures.
The results add weight to the view that the synergies are encoded in the brainstem or spinal cord, areas that were unaffected in these patients.
Tables 1 and 2 describe core subjective and objective metrics that measure the potential effectiveness of identified synergies.
Molson Coors appointed Cathy Noonan to the position of Global Chief Synergies Officer, reporting to Daniel J.
To create fixed line-to-mobile synergies, however, Telecom Italia has to rejoin the controlling group that runs fixed-line carrier Brasil Telecom.
In most transactions, each potential buyer has a unique expectation as to the type and value of synergies that will arise from a particular acquisition.
Its addition to Synergy will provide extended market presence and larger infrastructure on top of USD5m in cost synergies and value re-engineering opportunities annually.
But in the long term, there could be 500 or 600 new jobs added to mine operations in the area as new mines made economical by the $350 million the company hopes to save annually through synergies created by the merger are opened.
Will having both fixed and mobile operations in overlapping areas create operational synergies, like reduced interconnection costs?