syndicate

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Syndicate

A group of banks that acts jointly, on a temporary basis, to loan money in a bank credit (syndicated credit) or to underwrite a new issue of bonds.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Syndicate

1. In banking, a group of banks that each lend an amount of money to a borrower, all at the same time and for the same purpose. The banks in a syndicate cooperate with each other for the duration of the project, even if they are otherwise competitors. Bank syndicates usually only lend large amounts of money. Every syndicate is a temporary arrangement.

2. In investment banking, a group of underwriters responsible for placing a new issue of a security with investors. As with banking syndicates, the members of an underwriting syndicate work together for the duration of the project. Every syndicate is a temporary arrangement. It is also called a purchase group or a selling syndicate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

syndicate

A combination of investment banking firms that bids on a new security issue and then sells it if the bid is successful. The syndicate disbands when the security offering has been completed. Syndicates are needed to spread the risk and obtain greater financial and marketing resources for large issues. Also called purchase group, underwriting syndicate. See also agreement among underwriters, breaking the syndicate, selling group.

syndicate

To distribute shares of ownership in a partnership or joint venture. For example, a brokerage firm may syndicate ownership in certain oil and gas properties.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Syndicate.

When a group of investment banks works together to underwrite and distribute a new security issue, they are acting as a syndicate.

Syndicates are temporary, forming to purchase the securities from the issuer and dissolving once the issue is distributed.

However, new syndicates, involving some of or all the same banks, form on a regular basis to underwrite each new issue. You may also hear these underwriting syndicates called purchase groups, underwriting groups, or distributing syndicates.

In other financial contexts, syndicate may refer to any group of financial institutions that works together on a particular project. Syndicate also describes a group of investors who make a joint investment in a company.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

syndicate

A method of selling real property in which a sponsor—the syndicator—sells interests to investors. At one time limited partnerships were the preferred vehicle.Today tenant-in-common properties (TICs) are extremely popular.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
banks, the rapid deterioration in large syndicated loans comes at a time when the majority of banks have strong capital bases and earnings.
Tim Cien, manager of sales and marketing at Copley News Service, adds that newspapers can generate local sidebars to accompany syndicated content.
(Some syndicated features sold to Internet clients are designed specifically for online use.) There are also customers who buy content on a one-shot basis via a syndicate's Web site.
Jack Loftis, editor emeritus and soon-to-be-retired associate publisher of the Houston Chronicle, says the paper has not cut its huge total of about 75 comics -- or its syndicated buys in general.
"It's easier [for newspapers] to drop a couple of columns than to lay off an employee." But Haslanger says it's important for papers to have a mix of local content and syndicated material.
Also, Internet delivery and other forms of electronic transmission have made syndicated material easier to receive and customize - and thus more attractive - to clients in recent years.
Some newspaper sites, of course, still have mostly local content, with few or no syndicated features in the mix.
Because many newspaper Web sites still cam fewer syndicated features than print editions do--and because space isn't a problem online Execs also said that as newspaper Web sites become more profitable, syndicates will be able to raise feature prices to more of a market rate.
Wiser did note that male-written features can obviously also appeal to women and that there are now more syndicated male creators with sensibilities forged during the era of rising gender equality.
Wilson said if a United executive -- whether female or male -- loves a feature, it will be syndicated even if every other United executive does not like it.
"Syndicated features are a very good deal," commented senior vice president/editorial director David Hendin of United Media (UM), the parent of United Feature Syndicate (UFS) and Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA).
Several syndicated packages are also doing well during the recession, partly because they offer papers a lot for the money.

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