suspect

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suspect

A person identified as possibly having an interest in buying, but who has not yet been contacted or has not yet given any evidence of interest. Contrast with a prospect, who has indicated some interest in buying and who appears to have the desire and the ability to purchase.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Female group scored higher adaptability, general ability, morality, sensitivity, shrewdness, suspiciousness, and tension dimensions of personality.Sravanthi, S.
schizophrenia, delusional disorder, bipolar disorder, dementia, schizotypal personality disorder), persecutory delusions are often associated with high levels of distress, aggression, suspiciousness, ideas of reference and non-compliance, argued to make it one of the more challenging presentations to therapeutically work with (Bentall, 2014; Munro, 1999).
Wong and Qi propose a back propagation (BP) neural network in [10], which utilizes the coverage data of test cases (e.g., the coverage data with respect to which statements are executed by which test case) and their corresponding execution results to train the network and, then, input the coverage of a set of virtual test cases (e.g., each test case covers only one statement) to the trained network, and the outputs are regarded as the suspiciousness (i.e., likelihood of containing the bug) of each executable statement.
* Fear or suspiciousness of others or a strong nervous feeling
--often avoids the answer to questions, increased suspiciousness;
Psychology professor David LaPorte acknowledges that everyone experiences some paranoia, but his focus in this engaging work is paranoia as a disorder, characterized by "excessive suspiciousness," "hostility, rigidity, and lack of trust." After defining paranoia, he delves into the mind of the paranoid individual, details kinds of paranoia and their causes, and demonstrates where paranoia comes from by exploring the origins of suspiciousness.
At minimum, agents can refer suspect reports to special investigative units with relevant priorities based on the combination of size and suspiciousness of the claim.
Hofstadter allowed that he had borrowed a clinical term, but he thought that "no other word adequately evokes the sense of heated exaggeration, suspiciousness, and conspiratorial fantasy that I have in mind." What he had in mind could be described as periodic bouts of messianic populism that seemed to seize--and almost throttle-the American popular imagination at various points in US history.
The primary endpoint was the mean change from baseline to day 28 on the 30-item Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score, which measures positive symptoms such as delusions, suspiciousness, and hallucinations; negative symptoms, such as blunted affect, social and emotional withdrawal, and stereotyped thinking; and general psychopathology, such as anxiety, tension, depression, and active social avoidance.
As reported by his family members, his first episode began as bipolar mania with psychotic features characterized as insomnia, talking too much, increased self-confidence, suspiciousness, mumbling to himself, hearing voices, thoughts of being a rich commander and expecting an outbreak of war during his military service in August 2001.
Mihai Co]ovanu may have meant to please me, or even scare me, or simply get rid of me--because what I now know of him will not fit in with the profile of a paranoid personality who has a pervasive distrust and suspiciousness of others such that their motives are interpreted as malevolent, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four, or more (DSM-5: 301.0; ICD: F60.0) of the following: