Supranational

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Supranational

Describing an organization that exists in multiple countries. While, theoretically, supranational could refer to multinational corporations, the term most often describes an international government or quasi-government organization. Examples include the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund. Supranational organizations often have a direct role in regulation. For example, an international treaty may set up certain standards for international trade. It is important to note, however, that enforcement of these provisions is left to individual, sovereign governments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
supranationally. Full-blown power-sharing makes sense in institutions
supranationally. (176) While there are no easy answers, there are ways
It is also likely Churchill's views derived from the chaotic aftermath of the most destructive war in human history, and therefore he did not rule out in those early postwar years either a supranationally unified Europe or Britain's involvement with it in some form.
The globalized financial system allows the money center banks to make end runs around governments and then leverage their influence to promote the same deregulated and privatized environment within nation-states that they have been able to create for themselves supranationally. Since October 1981, for example, in response to pressure from Citicorp, Chase Manhattan and other money center banks, the Federal Reserve has permitted banking "enterprise zones' in the United States, moving offshore banking onshore and reproducing the unregulated and untaxed financial sanctuary of the Cayman Islands in cities like New York and Washington.
Supranationally (and regionally) it offers a platform for a 'new regionalism' that eschews power politics and geo-economic domination (Ethier 1998, Hettne 1999).
This distinction is critical: the relationship of an international delegation to the values of federalism depends on how the matter would be handled without an international delegation."' If the issue were left to the subnational states but for an international delegation that shifted control supranationally, then--as explored in detail below--the delegation would compromise all of the federalism values discussed in Part II.