supplier


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Supplier

A company that provides goods or services to another company. These goods or services may be used to make a different good or service (which is then sold to customers). Alternately, the supplier may provide retail goods or services that a company simply re-sells.

supplier

a producer or distributor of a GOOD or SERVICE. See also INTERNAL SUPPLIER.

supplier

see FIRM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bixler, materials manager, identifies worker training as a key technical resource offered by material suppliers and one for which his company has an ongoing need.
Supplier relationship managers have been assigned to each to oversee the operational process and the achievement of performance metrics and strategic goals.
There will be multiple supplier success models, depending upon the product area, required competencies and a number of other competitive factors.
Regardless, the machine clothing supplier and the mill should work together to collect baseline data to be used as the benchmark.
The enhanced solution acts as a huge accelerator for eProcurement ROI by lowering supplier collaboration costs and significantly reducing the effort needed to automate supplier interactions.
Japanese precedents are less clear about whether a supplier has an unimpeded right to refuse to renew a distribution agreement.
Advance Shipping Notice (ASN) -- A supplier acknowledges the order by sending an ASN to the purchaser.
If its service and product performance are acceptable (and no outstanding issues exist), a supplier is unlikely to receive an in-depth, on-site customer survey.
As the partnership with your supplier develops, you may gain access to specific areas of the supplier's computer system to receive data electronically when you want it.
One supplier says that changing from a basic to a wear-resistant barrel material can add $150,000 to a mid-sized machine.
CEOs gathered by Chief Executive to report on preferred supplier progress--at the Turnberry Isle Yacht and Country Club--were continuing to wrestle with the basics of the new supplier relationship that leads to certified status.
In terms of the opening example, the current approach would answer both questions in the negative-neither the banks outside the area nor the services available from nonbank suppliers would be viewed as important alternative supplies of banking services for the area and thus would be considered not to mitigate the anticompetitive effects within the area.