suitability rule

Suitability Rule

A stated or implied requirement by a regulatory body that a broker or investment adviser must reasonably believe that a certain investment decision will benefit a client before making a recommendation to him/her. That is, the broker or investment adviser must act in good faith, and may not knowingly recommend bad investments. Different regulators and self-regulating organizations incorporate suitable rules in different places in their bylaws. Two commonly referenced suitability rules are Rule 2310 for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority and Rule 405 for the NYSE. See also: Due diligence, Prudent-person rule, Twisting.

suitability rule

A National Association of Securities Dealers guideline that requires a brokerage firm to have reasonable grounds for believing a recommendation fits the investment needs of a client. See also Rule 405.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giffin analyze the assertion by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) that its suitability rule implicitly requires a broker-dealers recommendations to be consistent with customers best interests.
The DFS recently issued its own suitability rule for those selling annuities and life insurance products.
* Strengthening investor-protection requirements in FINRA's suitability rule;
Monzon said they have added a suitability rule on people running the company before approving the company's application for initial public offering (IPO).
He said the PSE had informed the company in a letter on March 13, 2017 that the case filed by the government against the LBC Group 'raised serious concerns with regard to LBC's compliance with the PSE Suitability Rule.'
We wouldn't have gotten the Harkin Amendment if we didn't have the suitability rule in place."
Applicability of the Suitability Rule to Investment
The new suitability rule could be stretched far enough to apply to this communication, though that would be an unrealistic and harsh standard for an impromptu and very preliminary marketing pitch.
In connection with its continuing process of reconciling regulations as part of the FINRA consolidated rulebook, FINRA had proposed changes to FINRA Rule 2090, the know your customer rule, and Rule 2111, the suitability rule. In late August 2010, the final proposed rules were published for comment and the comment period closed last month.
It called the broker-dealer standard of care under the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority's suitability rule "ineffective in protecting investors receiving personalized investment advice because it leaves substantial gaps in coverage when compared to the fiduciary standard applicable to investment advisers."
Each suitability rule created by the user belongs to a specific land-use type.