Ballot

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Related to suffrage: Suffrage movement, Male suffrage

Ballot

The document distributed at the annual meeting to shareholders of record who wish to vote their shares in person.

Ballot

A document on which a shareholder records his/her preference for a decision, especially in elections for the board of directors. The ballot may represent one vote per shareholder, but more commonly, it represents one vote per share, giving persons and companies with more shares greater say. Ballots may be filled electronically, over the phone, or in person on paper. They are used at the annual meeting of shareholders and other meetings the company may call. See also: Proxy Ballot.
References in periodicals archive ?
a reasonable proposition."), in 4 MILLER NAWSA SUFFRAGE SCRAPBOOKS,
Emancipation temporarily trumped suffrage, she said ...
The state recently launched a new website, pa.gov/women-vote, which offers a comprehensive guide to the Pennsylvania women and events that played an integral part in the state and national suffrage movement.
"Our research into the locations of the Scottish suffrage campaign has initially focused on Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire.
Pro-suffrage postcards also suffered from the prejudices held by many of the white women who led the suffrage movement, women who envisioned a future electorate comprising only privileged white women and men.
Anthony, in the context of the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, and the women's suffrage movement.
Suffrage intersected frequently, if not universally, with other struggles.
The University of British Columbia Press series, Women's Suffrage and the Struggle for Democracy, aids such an examination.
The Irish Citizen was founded in May 1912 by Francis Sheehy-Skeffington and James Cousins, who felt that there should be a "paper of our own to keep the British and Irish suffrage movements distinct and carry on propaganda along our own lines" (13).
"Her place within the movement is that she's part of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Society, so her way of petitioning is writing letters and she has a certain level of contempt for the women who have been using violent forms."
Documents, images, and video and audio recordings will trace the movement leading to the women's rights convention at Seneca Falls, N.Y., the contributions of suffragists who worked to persuade women that they deserved the same rights as men, the divergent political strategies and internal divisions they overcame, the push for a Federal women's suffrage amendment, and the legacy of this movement.
One Hundred Years of Struggle: The History of Women and the Vote in Canada provides a much-needed comprehensive history of the struggle for female suffrage in Canada, putting it into a wider chronological and political context than most treatments, typically bound by the dates of the actual campaign, circa 1880s to 1940.