subsurface rights

subsurface rights

See mineral rights.

References in periodicals archive ?
The result is a wide diffusion of subsurface rights among multiple owners.
Arctic Slope Regional Corporation would own the subsurface rights.
Of the states 2.2-million-acre system, there are approximately 600,500 acres of state forest land available for gas development, either through historic DCNR-issued leases, or on areas where the commonwealth does not own the subsurface rights.
After the taking, the landowner does not own those subsurface rights, but that has no bearing on the use or utility of the surface unless there are related surface takings that would also be compensated.
Original: The Bangsamoro government shall have the authority, power and right to explore, develop and utilize the natural resources, including surface and subsurface rights, inland waters, coastal waters and renewable and nonrenewable resources in the Bangsamoro.
Plum Creek has agreed to acquire 501,000 acres of industrial timberlands in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia; an investment in joint ventures consisting of 109,000 acres of high-value rural lands and development-quality lands near Charleston, S.C.; and subsurface rights, mineral rights and wind power assets associated with the timberlands.
(1) it transfers subsurface rights to claims holders, arguably threatening RRDC's asserted aboriginal title, and
However, as subsurface rights belong to the Crown, landowners have little incentive to allow drilling on their property.
Further, such drilling operations are often set up as site-specific corporations or LLC/LLPs, which are then dissolved after operations are completed, leaving even those home owners with indemnity agreements holding the bag for environmental harm because they own the property (and subsurface rights) and leased access to the firms that caused the harm at issue.
The project developer must acquire not only surface property rights but also subsurface rights.
For quartz mining of silver, individuals could not settle disputes over subsurface rights to follow a vein of silver, but the Nevada legislature's first order of business was to enact statutes to clarify property rights.
The author and his colleagues played a major role here as they attended meetings in isolated communities and delineated pockets of subsurface rights that they felt should be part of any agreement.
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