substitute

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Substitute

A good or service that satisfies a consumer's needs or desires just as well or almost as well as a similar good or service. A common type of substitute is an off-brand product; for example, a grocery store may sell its own peanut butter to compete with the on-brand peanut butter it also sells. Often, though not always, the price of a substitute is lower than that of the original product, but they follow generally the same trends. For example, if demand for the on-brand peanut butter rises, its price increases, but so does the price of the off-brand peanut butter, because consumers are willing to pay more for peanut butter generally, but are still looking for a bargain.

substitute

See swap.
References in periodicals archive ?
The European directive induced the German legislator to renew the established VVG rules for substitutive PHI.
Example of iconic and symbolic gestures, images type, communicative, substitutive, gestures+words (in Ponti p.
substitutive function in civil litigation: (1) the content of the order
Using substitutive representations when information should
With less scope to respond independently to pursue their substitutive role, Catholic organisations are also frustrated by an inability to achieve partnerships with government to determine spending priorities.
According to tax attorney Luis Ortiz from Basche, Ringe & Correa, the concept of a substitutive tax cannot be clearly defined in legal terms.
But this conversion appears less surprising when viewed in light of the substitutive aspect of sacrifice that Rene Girard describes in La Violence et le sacre.
The second problem is that reality can be clouded by substitutive words.
"But from my own observations, I believe that online news and information have been additive and not substitutive. Studies have suggested that people who use the Internet a lot for getting news are also heavy consumers of traditional media sources.
Benhabib has rightly pointed out that critiques of universalism choose to use "substitutive" rather than "interactive conceptions of the idea.
The Internet is an "additive" marketing channel, rather than a "substitutive" one.
Thus, we have a discussion of Du Bois that recognizes his displaced guilt for the death of his mother: In Dark Princess we see a "heavily concealed, much displaced, unconscious desire to exclude the social world and re-embrace the dyadic union with the sovereign dark matriarch, who is yet another displacement for the lost and clearly omnipotent mother." The discussion of Wright is similarly intriguing, uncovering the "infantile sadistic fantasies" that cause the white hero of Savage Holiday to kill a neighboring woman in a substitutive fantasy of matricide.