subsidiarity


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Subsidiarity

In Catholic social justice theory, the idea that decisions should be made at the lowest feasible level of governance. That is, subsidiarity states that humans, while basically the same, sometimes have different needs and if possible should be able to solve their own problems without having solutions imposed upon them. This concept has been used to criticize socialism and state regulation more generally. See also: Solidarity.

subsidiarity

a principle enshrined in the MAASTRICHT TREATY which affirms that, wherever possible, decision-making in the EUROPEAN UNION (EU) should be ‘taken as close as possible to the citizens’ affected. This implies that matters affecting all member countries need to be resolved at an EU-wide level whereas matters affecting only an individual member country are best left to the member concerned. See SOCIAL CHAPTER, COMPETITION POLICY (EU).

subsidiarity

a term used in the context of the position of the EUROPEAN UNION (EU) authorities vis-à-vis individual member countries with regard to the locus of power and responsibilities in the application of central EU policies to member countries. For example, EU COMPETITION LAWS take precedence over the national competition laws of member countries. However, a subsidiarity provision can be invoked, which permits the competition authority of a member country to request permission from the EU Competition Directorate to investigate a particular dominant firm or merger case if it appears that the ‘European dimension’ is relatively minor compared to its purely local impact.
References in periodicals archive ?
What can be said about the utility and relevance of subsidiarity? From the considerations outlined above there is hardly any set of observable institutional conditions under which application of the principle within the current context of intergovernmental relations in the Caribbean would demonstrate its full transformative value.
Introduction of subsidiarity into the present local governance discourse in the Caribbean represents a search for a policy instrument outside of the familiar, to resolve the issue of how best to redistribute power among levels of government and in particular the problems power imbalances between central and local government have engendered.
Federalism and subsidiarity are the two dominant theories that are
differences and similarities between federalism and subsidiarity as
Subsidiarity is ultimately about building stronger communities in which government is a necessary--but not the only--form of social organization.
Here is where subsidiarity properly plays a significant role.
In any case, subsidiarity is a similar principle to federalism and can help justify its pertinence.
As Private law scholar, I will focus on social subsidiarity. Article 118 of Italian Constitution provides that <<The State, regions, metropolitan cities, provinces and municipalities shall promote the autonomous initiatives of citizens, both as individuals and as members of associations, relating to activities of general interest, on the basis of the principle of subsidiarity>>.
Yet even though subsidiarity may not provide all the answers to the challenge of allocating powers in global governance, it represents a useful starting point.
In that scheme, he said, "the ethic that pertains to the unity of the body is called solidarity The ethic that pertains to the role of the parts is subsidiarity And the good of the whole by which solidarity and subsidiarity are measured is called, in Catholic social teaching, the 'common good.'"
The type of rules selected to solve such conflicts reflect an organising principle of our federation: subsidiarity.
Thus the book provides not only an insight into the practical dimensions of the Catholic concept of subsidiarity, but also a vision of governance that carries us beyond the false choice of self-help or reliance on government.