subsidiarity


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Subsidiarity

In Catholic social justice theory, the idea that decisions should be made at the lowest feasible level of governance. That is, subsidiarity states that humans, while basically the same, sometimes have different needs and if possible should be able to solve their own problems without having solutions imposed upon them. This concept has been used to criticize socialism and state regulation more generally. See also: Solidarity.

subsidiarity

a principle enshrined in the MAASTRICHT TREATY which affirms that, wherever possible, decision-making in the EUROPEAN UNION (EU) should be ‘taken as close as possible to the citizens’ affected. This implies that matters affecting all member countries need to be resolved at an EU-wide level whereas matters affecting only an individual member country are best left to the member concerned. See SOCIAL CHAPTER, COMPETITION POLICY (EU).

subsidiarity

a term used in the context of the position of the EUROPEAN UNION (EU) authorities vis-à-vis individual member countries with regard to the locus of power and responsibilities in the application of central EU policies to member countries. For example, EU COMPETITION LAWS take precedence over the national competition laws of member countries. However, a subsidiarity provision can be invoked, which permits the competition authority of a member country to request permission from the EU Competition Directorate to investigate a particular dominant firm or merger case if it appears that the ‘European dimension’ is relatively minor compared to its purely local impact.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in the articles published in Provincia the principle of subsidiarity is presented as being "one of the strongest pillars of societal organisation" having "a vital role, because through the medium of it the hierarchies of attributions could be divided depending on competences and could make possible a dynamic decentralisation, taking into consideration all specific details of the existent problems", a principle by dint of "the competences organised vertically are redistributed horizontally, preserving the extent of system integration" (59).
The principle of subsidiarity is considered a principle which is "able to activate the local energies" (61), but which was "permanently ignored" (62).
The intellectuals reunited in the group Provincia (active in the period 2000-2003) self-assigned the task to promote some concepts completely unknown for the large public: subsidiarity, decentralisation, autonomy, and regionalisation.
Catholic social thought, often seen as central to the modern rise of subsidiarity as a political principle, (19) employed subsidiarity to delineate spheres in which government can and should act, while at the same time protecting individuals and societal associations from what was regarded as excessive intervention.
In order to retain conceptual clarity and make the concept of subsidiarity useful both for analytical purposes and for normative guidance, we need to specify in which sense we are using it here.
As a starting point, we understand subsidiarity as a rebuttable presumption for the local (23)--as a principle that requires decisionmaking to take place at a lower level unless good reasons exist for shifting it upward.
With its basis in the Catholic understanding of community, said Schneck, subsidiarity instead "refers to the appropriate balancing of responsibilities and functions among the parts of a social order.
In practical terms, he said, labor unions are "perfect examples of subsidiarity in practice.
In areas which do not fall within its exclusive competence, the Community shall take action, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, only if and in so far as the objectives of the proposed action cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States and can therefore by reason of the scale or effects of the proposed action, be better achieved by the Community.
The legal significance of the principle of subsidiarity is its regulation of the exercise of concurrent powers, which can be interpreted from two perspectives, that: (a) the Community should not take an action or pursue a policy that can be sufficiently taken or pursued by Member States; and (b) the Community can take an action or pursue a policy, which by reason of 'its scale or effects' is better handled at this level.
Federalism and subsidiarity are the two dominant theories that are
differences and similarities between federalism and subsidiarity as