Subject

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Subject

Refers to a bid or offer that cannot be executed without confirmation from the customer. In other words, not firm, but a bid/offer that needs additional information/confirmation before becoming firm and is therefore still negotiable.

Subject

Describing a bid or offer for a security that is still negotiable. That is, a subject bid/offer is not firm and requires confirmation before a transaction involving it can be executed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the appellants had actively participated in litigating the fourth parcel before the trial court without objecting to the ostensible pleading defect, they raised the issue for the first time in the Supreme Court, claiming it was "jurisdictional." With the above-quoted language, the court excused the appellants' failure to raise the issue below, expressly relying on the rule that defects of subject matter jurisdiction cannot be waived by the parties.
Thus, all claims which seek recovery for wrongful death must be dismissed for lack of subject matter jurisdiction.
Comprehension: teacher must understand the purpose, composition and deep information about the subject matter. He should have knowledge about what to teach, how to teach and when to teach?
If you want your General Counsel to give you access to matters and internal clients outside of your subject matter expertise, this is a great starting point for getting to that result.
This involves meticulous reading of subject matter. Thus, many answers may be derived from the text selection being read.
It also provides additional examples of subject matter eligible claims in various technologies as well as sample analyses applying the Supreme Court and Federal Circuit's considerations for determining whether a claim is subject matter eligible.
For example, a claim directed to the purified natural product 2-methyl-2-pentenoic acid, isolated from strawberries, would no longer be considered patentable subject matter. In other words, though a claim to the compound itself could meet two of the major requirements for patentability (novelty and inventiveness), an inventor would not be able to obtain patent protection simply because 2-methyl-2-pentenoic acid is a product of nature.
The Court, however, ruled that, by testifying to the conversations himself, the defendant had waived the attorney-client privilege not only as to the matters that the defendant chose to disclose, but also as to any other conversations with the attorney concerning the same subject matter. (9)
Here we will suggest that this acknowledgement also effectively commits the thinker to thinking the very (im)possibility of the autonomous collective as the more precisely defined subject matter for thinking.

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