subdivide

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subdivide

To separate property into smaller parcels for sale or borrowing purposes. People normally think of a subdivision as related to development of a residential area,but the definition is not that restrictive.

Example: A seller wishing to sell only a portion of a parcel of real property may have to apply for subdivision approval before the sale, including assignment of a new tax parcel identification number. Borrowers sometimes subdivide property so that a mortgage will be on only a specific improvement, such as a house, and the land reasonably necessary to support that improvement, rather than have a mortgage encumber more land than is necessary.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
homes and requiring subdivider approval of building plans were
(29) For the best account of the subdivider's role in city development and the rise of urban planning, see Weiss.
However, the subdivision development process gets more confusing when dealing with a developer-builder undertaking the dual role of a developer (subdivider) and house builder, and making the distinction between "developer's profit" and "builder's profit." As suggested by Mr.
Florence Dickson, a grand-daughter of Dumfries Township founder William Dickson Sr., was the largest subdivider of lands in the neighbourhood.
Water service was to be extended to future units as requested by the subdivider. The agreement was to bind the parties as well as their "successors and assigns."
With use of the before and after approach, however, the intrinsic value of development rights (which takes the perspective of the subdivider) is likely to be significantly lower, especially in a faltering economy.
adversely affect the right of the subdivider or developer or his
When I looked at the rooms, I saw that they created subdividers and bunk beds.
Specialty trade contractors took in $51,000 on average, while builders grossed $74,000 and subdividers took in $158,000.
Second, the "conceived space," referring to our conceptual knowledge of spaces which is primarily produced by discourses of power and ideology, that is, "the space of scientists, planners, urbanists, technocratic subdividers and social engineers." The third space is the "lived space," or in Lefebvre's words, "space as directly lived through its associated images and symbols, and hence the space of 'inhabitants' and 'users'" (ibid.: 38-39).
Although housing subsidies and regulation were political impossibilities at the time, most cities actively encouraged peripheral growth by funding attractive parks and parkways, accepting the dedication of unimproved streets, shifting the costs of street pavements and utilities away from subdividers and onto taxpayers and accepting the annexation petitions of politically independent areas that wanted access to city-funded utilities and services.
Blanket mortgages frequently are incurred by subdividers or developers who have purchased a single tract of land for the purpose of dividing it into smaller parcels for sale or development.