structure

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Structure

The description of how a project financing is drawdown, repaid, and collateralized secured.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Structure

1. See: Capital structure.

2. A building or other improvement to real estate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

structure

the pattern of roles and relationships in a GROUP or ORGANIZATION. See also BUREAUCRACY and ORGANIZATION CHART.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

structure

Any constructed improvement to a site.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To assess whether the investment level is adequate in any given year, we need to know both what the actual level of structures is as well as what the optimal level should be.
The purpose of this paper is to define generalized weak structures which is weaker than weak structures [2].
These objects, which begin as two-dimensional structures, fold themselves into final, functional three-dimensional shapes.
Air structures are used frequently as practice sport facilities but require a constant source of energy to maintain the air pressure to keep them inflated.
Of course, many other lesson structures are possible.
Redman (kredman@gecgrp.com) is a U.K.-trained attorney with extensive expertise in trust and offshore entity structures. She is CEO of GEC Group, LLC (www.gecgrp.com), a professional entity-management services organization specializing in global entity formation and management.
However, organizational culture, systems and structures often act as barriers to successfully implementing the changes required to move toward that vision.
Advocating greater attention to the analysis of social structure, often though not always involving attention to social class, does not require insistence on a sterile or purely quantitative anatomical approach.
Higher order thinking skills, like analysis and synthesis, are essential to the proper conscious manipulation of grammatical structures placing gifted and talented students in a position to excel linguistically.

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