Stress Testing

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Stress Testing

A process, usually computerized, that evaluates an institution's reaction to different situations. Specifically, stress testing measures whether the institution has adequate capital and/or assets to respond effectively to various, adverse scenarios presented by the computer program. Stress testing became particularly important in the United States in the spring of 2009 when Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner conducted a series on troubled American financial institutions to determine which were able to raise private capital and could therefore begin repaying TARP funds extended the previous year.
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Supposedly, the subjects should have been capable of placing the correct stress on first syllable in the root words.
Stress is a protective and adaptive response for our body and mind to cope with continual changes and demand in our lives.
Let us mention that since at the edge of the panel the stress component, perpendicular to the edge, is zero, the stresses at the edge can be correctly determined from the photoelastic image using extrapolation.
A national stress survey conducted by APA found that, during the year, 31% of women turn to food to manage stress compared to 19% of men.
Stress is thought to be a cause of relapse to drug addiction.
Brain research now indicates that people exposed to stress are more likely to abuse alcohol or other drugs, or to relapse to drug addiction.
The device would alert the wearer to the looming danger of a potential stress fracture.
One can see from equation 2 that shear stress (usually in kPa) is directly proportional to the measured barrel pressure.
FEA simulation can be programmed to show the relative stress at various locations on the horn and a displacement simulation that shows the relative amplitude of movement at those locations.
According to Maslach, when physicians' stress turns into burnout they experience depleted energy, lowered resistance to illness, increased absenteeism and decreased effectiveness on the job.
Numerous studies have shown compelling evidence that stress affects major disease onset and progression (Cohen & Herbert, 1996; Seyle, 1950) and lowers general physical well being (Diong & Bishop, 1999).
Money, health and relationships are some of the common contributors to stress in the United States.