strategy


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Strategy

The general or specific approach to investing that an individual, institution, or fund manager employs.

Strategy

The principles guiding investment practices. A strategy may be simple, such as buy low, sell high, or complex, like many option strategies. The basic aim of any strategy is to make money, but each takes a different (sometimes very different) approach to achieve this goal.

strategy

a unified set of plans and actions designed to secure the achievement of the basic objectives of a business or of some other organization: BUSINESS OBJECTIVES represent the goals of the organization, i.e. the economic (and social) purposes for which the business exists; strategy is the means used to attain these goals. See BUSINESS STRATEGY, MARKETING STRATEGY, FOREIGN MARKET SERVICING STRATEGY.

strategy

see BUSINESS STRATEGY, COMPETITIVE STRATEGY, FOREIGN MARKET SERVICING STRATEGY, MEDIUM-TERM FINANCIAL STRATEGY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two undergraduate students coded the data in the following way: If a student answered "yes" to a question and provided an appropriate strategy, then a point was scored for each strategy mentioned.
Entrance Strategy -- How will you enter the region?
In those situations when a risk assessment is conducted after the business strategy is developed, the strategy must be reevaluated to consider risks not identified during the risk assessment.
The point is, it is difficult to communicate a marketing strategy that has not been developed or articulated within the company.
Besides cost and service levels, logistics strategy can also be based on providing value-added services, flexibility, or innovation.
In the other tactic, dubbed the add-subtract strategy, a child adds up the numbers on the left side of an equation and then subtracts the number on the right from the leftside total.
Unfortunately, to subordinate the sales strategy to the needs of the investment strategy, or vice versa, is difficult for insurers in part because they have traditionally not done this and thus do not have appropriate infrastructure or support mechanisms in place.
The idea is that if you're not balancing the right measurements on your scorecard or describing them precisely, your strategy won't produce good results.
When this was no longer effective or feasible, most people probably compensated for their immutable disability by shifting to a secondary strategy that served to minimize the importance or value of objects outside the range of their visual acuity.
Strategy #1: To increase the use of positive reinforcement
One of the first principles of strategy is that the process is more important than the product.