Strange Attractor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Strange Attractor

An attractor in phase space, where the points never repeat themselves, and orbits never intersect, but they stay within the same region of phase space. Unlike limit cycles or point attractors, strange attractors are non-periodic, and generally have a fractal dimension. They are a picture of a non-linear, chaotic system. See: Attractor, Limit Cycle, Point Attractor.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The area circumscribed by this trace would be the strange attractor in Don Quixote, Figure 16.
and torus attractors, there are the "strange attractors,"
When applying the strange attractor phenomenon to civil confinement, several observations are worth noting.
Especially in the case of dissipative systems--those which dissipate their energy--the chaotic evolution may be organized around structures, called the 'strange attractors' by Ruelle because of their unexpected and strangely regular shapes, e.g.
Thus the integrating ideology of interest groups acts as a strange attractor: a set of overriding beliefs, assumptions, values, and customs that powerfully govern the behavior of individual constituents.
Ecologists are comfortable with the assertion that nonlinear systems can display limit cycles, multiple attractors, and strange attractors, because the assertion is a mathematical fact.
A second difficulty in the application of chaos theory is the use of a "strange attractor".
- Julia set, corresponding to the strange attractor, has no connected structure (1975-1981);
Mamaev, "Strange attractors in rattleback dynamics," Physics-Uspekhi, vol.
Sparrow, The Lorenz Equations: Bifurcations, Chaos, and Strange Attractors, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 1982.
As did a recent show at Strange Attractor, which featured nerdcore hip-hop legend MC Frontalot, along with local hip-hop artists such as Grand Arkanum and Lost Profit$.
Conversely, the chaos theory of careers also identifies the 'strange attractor' as the characteristic way in which complex dynamic systems operate and that demands open-systems thinking (Pryor & Bright, 2007b).