Stop


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Stop

1. An order to a broker to buy or sell a security at the best available price once a certain, stated price is reached. Suppose that price is $50. A stop order remains inactive until that security begins trading at $50, at which point the broker may fill the order at best price he/she is able to find. See also: Stop-limit order, Stop-loss order.

2. An order by the SEC to stop a new issue from taking place because of an omission or inaccuracy on its filing statement. See also: Deficiency letter.
References in classic literature ?
Fogg had not time to stop the brave fellow, who, opening a door unperceived by the Indians, succeeded in slipping under the car; and while the struggle continued and the balls whizzed across each other over his head, he made use of his old acrobatic experience, and with amazing agility worked his way under the cars, holding on to the chains, aiding himself by the brakes and edges of the sashes, creeping from one car to another with marvellous skill, and thus gaining the forward end of the train.
"Stop! Stop!" shouted the horse; "you're jarring me terribly."
"Well, then you stop at the Schreiber--it's full of Americans.
With the first full puff of the smoke he gave over his moans and yelps, the agitation began to fade out of him, and Daughtry, appreciatively waiting, saw the trembling go out of his hands, the pendulous lip-quivering cease, the saliva stop flowing from the corners of his mouth, and placidity come into the fiery remnants of his eyes.
The gang-plank being on the port side, Dag Daughtry paddled around to the starboard and brought the canoe to a stop under a certain open port.
He calls to them to stop, quite gently and politely at first.
And the small boys on the bank stop and jeer at him, and pitch stones at him as he is pulled along past them, at the rate of four miles an hour, and can't get out.
"One fella ten-boy altogether he stop," came the aged voice.
"My word, night he stop," the captain objected, then added, as a concession against the known rule that visitors were not permitted aboard after nightfall: "You come on board, boy stop 'm along boat."
"Who'll stop me?" said the Slogger, raising his hand again.
"Stop a bit," says that hero, looking uncomfortably at Williams, who is puffing away on his second's knee, winded enough, but little the worse in any other way.
I ordered the driver to stop because I thought it would please you, as you are said to love flowers, and especially that the feast of which is celebrated to-day."