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Stock

Ownership of a corporation indicated by shares, which represent a piece of the corporation's assets and earnings.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Stock

A portion of ownership in a corporation. The holder of a stock is entitled to the company's earnings and is responsible for its risk for the portion of the company that each stock represents. There are two main classes of stock: common stock and preferred stock. Common stock holders have the right to vote on major company decisions, such as whether or not to merge with another corporation, and receive dividends determined by management. Preferred stock holders do not usually have voting rights, but receive a minimum dividend. Stock may be bought or sold, usually, though not always, in the context of a securities exchange. It is important to note that a single share of a stock usually represents only a tiny amount of ownership, and, therefore, most stocks are traded in batches of 100.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

stock

An ownership share or ownership shares in a corporation. See also bearer stock, common stock, preferred stock, stock class.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Stock.

Stock is an equity investment that represents part ownership in a corporation and entitles you to part of that corporation's earnings and assets.

Common stock gives shareholders voting rights but no guarantee of dividend payments. Preferred stock provides no voting rights but usually guarantees a dividend payment.

In the past, shareholders received a paper stock certificate -- called a security -- verifying the number of shares they owned. Today, share ownership is usually recorded electronically, and the shares are held in street name by your brokerage firm.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Stockclick for a larger image
Fig. 79 Stock. Diagram showing the main components.

stock

  1. the part of a firm's ASSETS that are held in the form of raw materials, work in progress and finished goods. These are also known as INVENTORIES. Finished goods are held in stock to ensure that goods are available when required by customers. Raw materials and components are held in stock to prevent disruptions to production caused by lack of materials or components and to secure economies from BULK BUYING. Decisions as to what level of stock to hold may not be entirely in the businessman's hands. Involuntary investment may occur when demand turns out to be less than a producer's expectations. Fig. 79 shows the main components of stock. See STOCK VALUATION, STOCK CONTROL, CONSIGNMENT INVENTORY, DEPENDENT INVENTORY, INDEPENDENT INVENTORY.
  2. a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a JOINT-STOCK COMPANY or by the government as a means of raising long-term capital. In some countries (for example the US) stockholders are the equivalent of shareholders and are the owners of the company In other countries (for example the UK) stock is a form of repayable, fixed-interest DEBT and stockholders are creditors of the company not shareholders. Stocks are traded on the STOCK MARKET. See SHARE CAPITAL.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

stock

  1. the parts of a firm's ASSETS that are held in the form of raw materials, work-in-progress and finished goods. These are also known as INVENTORIES. Finished goods are held in stock to ensure that goods are available when required by customers. Raw materials and components are held in stock to prevent disruptions to production caused by lack of materials or components and to secure economies from bulk purchasing.

    The rate at which firms accumulate and deplete their stocks influences (see STOCK CONTROL) the oscillations in economic activity (see BUSINESS CYCLE). Although the increase and decrease in stocks operates on the same ACCELERATOR principle as capital investment, the decision as to what level of stock to hold may not be entirely in the businessman's hands. Involuntary investment may occur when demand turns out to be less than a producer's expectations so that stock builds up during downturns in the business cycle (see INVENTORY INVESTMENT).

  2. a FINANCIAL SECURITY issued by a JOINT-STOCK COMPANY or by the government as a means of raising long-term capital. In some countries (for example, the USA) stockholders are the equivalent of shareholders and are the owners of the company. In other countries (for example, the UK), stock is a form of repayable, fixed-interest DEBT, and stockholders are creditors of the company not shareholders. Stocks are traded on the STOCK EXCHANGE. See SHARE CAPITAL.
  3. a measurement of quantity at one specific point in time. Unlike a FLOW, a stock is not a function of time. The analogy is frequently made between a tank holding a given stock of water and water entering and leaving the tank as flows of water per minute.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
manufacturing of a wide variety of products in small quantities, quick delivery, and stockless production) while maintaining its tradition of diversification both to develop new business systems and create competitive advantages.
There is already evidence to suggest that dealers benefit from being stockless because of the space that has been released and because of the improved response that they can give to customers.
Description: Winchester privatized its city office supply system, replacing it with a stockless supply system.
Allen Bradley's CIM showcase uses stockless production, advanced machine diagnostics and next-day shipping.
In addition to keeping wholesaler records current to ensure that products are stored and shipped productively, drug distributors can use the information to support stockless programs and reduce inventory at the pharmacy level.
As Des Garets[11] has clearly demonstrated, French retailing companies have gradually developed a dual management system depending on the products involved: when the products cannot be stored over long periods (fresh products) and/or when dealing with fast moving lines, companies tend to transit through stockless platforms - this is QR management; on the other hand, when products with a distant sell-by date are offered by the suppliers, with particularly attractive promotions (cleaning products), they are bought in very large quantifies and stored - this is forecast planning based on an anticipated demand.
and Hall, R.W., "Management specs for stockless production", Harvard Business Review, Vol.
The newspaper for several years has moved to a stockless system, in which it has contracts with suppliers for eight areas of frequent purchasing, including electrical parts, press bearings, lighting and plumbing.
By working with customers through EDI (electronic data interchange) and stockless inventory (just-in-time), or desktop delivery systems, we save our customers time and money throughout their company.
To illustrate the effect of a company's operating strategy on its risk assessment and risk control strategies, consider the example of a company - it could be a manufacturer or service provider - that has two deeply ingrained operational strategies: it employs the technique of stockless inventory, or just-in-time delivery of the inputs to the production or service delivery process, and it uses total quality management, or TQM.
Many of the most wealthy herders are now |absentee-owners', who employ stockless Il Chamus to herd for them.
Pius Egbelu--Design an integrated, stockless materials control system for the healthcare industry to eliminate or downsize the second tier warehousing effort now in place at most hospitals.