stigma

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stigma

A negative impression of property because of real or perceived problems.The most common stigma is associated with property that has remained on the market for whatever time period is locally considered “too long.”Potential buyers usually think there must be some problem with the property that they might or might not be able to recognize and economically cure, so they avoid such properties.Another common stigma is a commercial property,usually with a restaurant tenant, that has experienced high turnover.The reason might be that the tenants had insufficient financial resources to survive until the break-even point, but the property soon acquires a stigma as a bad location for restaurants.To some extent,the stigma can become a self-fulfilling prophecy if the community fails to patronize any business at that location because of the stigma.Despite that,there are tremendous opportunities for investors who target stigmatized properties and can successfully overcome the bad reputation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Stigma towards those who use mental health (MH) services is still very evident in our society.
Marketing strategies to promote careers in MH (reducing stigma and discrimination) and schemes that promote MH nursing as a valuable career could make a real difference.
Dr Helen Stigma, a public health issue which contributes to high rates of death and mental health concerns, has the potential to negatively affect a person's self-esteem, damage relationships, and prevent those suffering from addiction from accessing treatment.
Although multiple factors likely influence a person's reluctance to seek treatment for substance use, such as lack of insurance, ignorance of services, suspicion of treatment services, family/childcare obligations, or lack of access to services (Appel, Ellison, Jansky, & Oldak, 2004), this research focuses on the influence of stigma. The role of stigma may detrimentally impact treatment-seeking behaviors by causing individuals to conceal their stigmatized identities (Chronister, Chou, & Liao, 2013), to experience mental health concerns (Smith, Dawson, Goldstein, & Grant, 2010), and to encounter prejudice and discrimination (Schomerus, Matschinger, & Angermeyer, 2006).
Glycoprotein associated with the acquisition of the self-incompatibility system by maturing stigmas of Brassica oleracea.
Transgender individuals, as part of a gender minority group, experience a specific type of stigma known as transphobia, defined by Carrera-Fernandez, Lameiras-Fernandez, and Rodriguez-Castro (2014) as "negative attitudes and beliefs about transpeople" (p.
Unfortunately, unlike many things that laws can protect us from, laws prevent little when addressing health related stigmas. Scott Burris's paper, "Stigma and the Law" (presented at the NIH conference) points out that, "Law is most commonly seen as a tool for blunting the effects of stigma by protecting health information and prohibiting discrimination based on a health condition." Laws can prohibit behavior, but not the attitudes and the beliefs that motivate the behavior.
The stigma associated with HIV is a complex construct that includes diverse categories and dimensions.
The results indicated that flower morphological attributes namely anther length and breadth, stigma diameter, ovary length and breadth were found better in third flash.
Since Goffman's (1963) foundational work on "spoiled identities," stigma has been examined extensively.
Solanke relates discrimination in society to the concept of stigma and argues for an oanti-stigmao principle when designing laws and legal protections.