stigma


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stigma

A negative impression of property because of real or perceived problems.The most common stigma is associated with property that has remained on the market for whatever time period is locally considered “too long.”Potential buyers usually think there must be some problem with the property that they might or might not be able to recognize and economically cure, so they avoid such properties.Another common stigma is a commercial property,usually with a restaurant tenant, that has experienced high turnover.The reason might be that the tenants had insufficient financial resources to survive until the break-even point, but the property soon acquires a stigma as a bad location for restaurants.To some extent,the stigma can become a self-fulfilling prophecy if the community fails to patronize any business at that location because of the stigma.Despite that,there are tremendous opportunities for investors who target stigmatized properties and can successfully overcome the bad reputation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Etienne, says the first step to addressing stigma around dementia is having a conversation.
As many as 40% of men report weight-related stigma, meaning they're discriminated against or stereotyped because of their size.
Binti International focusing on breaking down stigma, shame and taboos around menstruation
Research has found that beyond the effects of BMI and depression, self-directed weight stigma is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and metabolic disease.
Although the Alzheimer's Society International and the World Health Organization acknowledge that stigma has a central role in defining the experience of AD, how stigma may present, how clinicians and researchers can recognize and measure stigma, and how to best combat it have been understudied.
A mediation analysis indicated that due to stigma and marginalization low level of social support significantly related to lower level of emotional well-being12.
Public stigma often results in self- stigma as "Internalization of guilt, blameworthiness, desperateness, blame and fear of discrimination that is related with psychological disorders".2 It is well documented that individuals suffering from severe psychological ailments (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) are the ones that face public and feel internalized stigma.3,4
Stigma may exist, but we can end it for good through creating awareness to the public that safe abortion is normal and a human right.
This was used to explain the perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and pattern of HIV/AIDs related stigma and discrimination on PLWHA and to discover reasons for some of the results obtained from the quantitative study.
Abortion stigma has been linked to negative outcomes, including fatal attacks on abortion providers and acts of domestic terrorism at abortion clinics (Harris, Debbink, Martin, & Hassinger, 2011).
Meanwhile, the announcement coincides with the second birthday of Chasing The Stigma, which has helped more than 25,000 people find mental health support through its award-winning app, the Hub of Hope.
Educational programs have been implemented to reduce public stigma, including programs that incorporate education factsheets, handouts with positive stories of individuals in recovery and other types of programs (for review, see Livingston, Milne, Fang, & Amari, 2011).