sterling area


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to sterling area: sterling bloc

sterling area

a group of countries (predominantly ex-British colonies) whose own national currencies were formerly linked directly to the value of the British POUND and who held STERLING as part of their INTERNATIONAL RESERVES
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He has resided in the Sterling area for the past 25 years.
Britain abandoned the old sterling area back in Harold Wilson's time, largely because friendly and trusting countries which held their national wealth in pounds became understandably less friendly and trusting when it was devalued.
When he realised the price difference, he returned the books and bought them in Derry City, just 20 miles away, but in the sterling area.
Over and above any pure commercial usage, gold served a political end -- maintaining the influence of what was known as the Sterling Area.
said, "Beardstown Savings has an established commitment to the Mount Sterling area with our banking office in the Mount Sterling Savings Center at 201 W.
He said: "The reality is a formal currency union with a shared sterling area is overwhelmingly in the rest of the UK's economic interests following a Yes vote and the stance of any UK Government will be very different the day after a Yes vote to the campaign rhetoric we are hearing now.
But Scottish Finance Secretary John Swinney said: "Ultimately, as Mr Carney makes clear, a sterling area is a matter for the two governments to agree.
Scottish economic advisers, the Fiscal Commission Working Group states Scotland should establish a so-called Sterling Area Sustainability Agreement and independent Scottish Fiscal Commission.
With [euro]30million of the useless coinage in circulation, it looks like a good idea that could be copied with 1p and 2p pieces in the sterling area.
She was a real estate broker for many years in the Sterling area.
In a survey of the country's economy, it said: 'To achieve a substantial increase of exports, particularly to countries outside the sterling area, remains Britain's basic problem.
He said: "A formal currency union with a shared sterling area is overwhelmingly in the rest of the UK's economic interests following a Yes vote and the stance of any UK government will be very different the day after a Yes vote to the campaign rhetoric we are hearing now.