stealth tax


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Hidden Tax

A tax that is built in to the price of a good or service that the buyer does not see. That is, rather than being added at the end of a transaction, like a sales tax, hidden taxes are included in the price. Examples of hidden taxes include corporate taxes, which can cause companies to raise their prices so as not to reduce profit, and VAT, in which taxes are added at every stage of production. See also: Inflation tax.

stealth tax

a ‘buzzword’ for a relatively obscure TAX increase (e.g. stamp duty) announced with little publicity and explanation, usually to be implemented some months later by which time people generally have ‘forgotten’ about it. See FISCAL POLICY.

stealth tax

a ‘buzzword’ for a relatively obscure TAX increase (for example, stamp duty) that is announced with little publicity and explanation, usually to be implemented some months later, by which time people generally have ‘forgotten’ about it. See FISCAL POLICY.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The PM claims the move will cut crime and save lives but you say it's a stealth tax.
In addition to the thousands of pounds in business rates each year I am now burdened with this stealth tax.
It's a good old-fashioned stealth tax from the Brown Treasury, as we can still call it.
This amounts to a stealth tax on local tenants and is simply unfair.
If the changes do go ahead as planned, more than pounds 1 billion a year may be raised from UK businesses through, what some may see as, an additional stealth tax
Pension fund values that rise and fall due to stock market movements and the low interest rates at the current time pale into insignificance when compared with the impact of this Brown stealth tax.
The Labour government can attempt to force another stealth tax on the country, but the Liberal Democrats in Liverpool will not introduce it here.
WITH reference to your report about National Express considering introducing a pounds 1 charge on all seat bookings (The Journal, January 19), which was described as a stealth tax, can I remind Tony Walker, spokesman for Railfuture, that not only did British Rail charge for seat reservations, but the passenger also had to prove they had a valid ticket for the train they were making the reservation on.
This is yet another stealth tax inflicted by Labour.
It is particularly regrettable that a Stealth Tax like this is being applied now.
But the LGA insisted the "save as you throw" proposals would not be a stealth tax to raise extra cash for councils.