statistics

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statistics

  1. methods of collecting and analysing numerical data.
  2. a group of data.

    Businesspeople make considerable use of statistical methods such as collecting SAMPLES in order to make STATISTICAL INFERENCES in such areas as MARKETING RESEARCH and QUALITY CONTROL. They also use government economic data in monitoring changes in the business environment.

statistics

  1. a branch of mathematics that studies the theory and methods of collecting, tabulating and analysing numerical data.
  2. a grouping of data. Economic analysis makes extensive use of economic data, which are subjected to statistical analysis in order to test ECONOMIC THEORIES. See HYPOTHESIS TESTING, ECONOMETRICS.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, only the improvement in the supplement group was statistically significant, because of the relatively large standard deviation in the placebo group.
The ANCOVA results for questions representing the participatory citizen and the justice-oriented citizen were not statistically significant.
There was a statistically significant difference in bone formation and quality between test and control sides.
But one of the UCLA study authors said categorizing the leukemia and lung cancer rates as statistically insignificant is ``very potentially misleading.
AND, STATISTICALLY, BOTH RESULTS ARE EQUALLY VALID.
9 points on a 10-point scale--is statistically significant, but its clinical significance, if any, needs to be examined more carefully.
All pairwise differences in the number of partners among these adolescents and those who had had a single partner were statistically significant.
44 percentile points on standardized tests, a figure that is not statistically significant.
Finally, an essential issue is whether the results of a study are not only statistically significant, but also clinically significant.
One of the benefits of examining the change in trends is that there are straightforward statistical tests to see if the change is statistically significant.
Without assessing the extent that the social influences approaches were already present or were introduced during the study within the Hutchinson control population, rival hypotheses that explain the lack of statistically significant differences become plausible.
Statistically, people with this history are at risk of developing definite MS over the next several years.

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