government

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Government Bond

Any bond issued by an agency of the United States government. Government bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the government and are considered risk-free. Most are negotiable, with prominent examples being Treasury securities or Ginnie Mae bonds. U.S. savings bonds, however, are not negotiable.

government

the primary decision-making body in a nation state responsible for national defence, maintaining law and order, etc. Government's economic role in the state depends upon the socio-political system the country has adopted, the two extremes being a CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY and a PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMY. In the former case, governments play an all-embracing role, often owning most economic resources and determining what products to produce. In the latter case, where resources are held privately and markets are the main mechanism for allocating resources, governments play a more restricted role, merely influencing the general level of economic activity through DEMAND MANAGEMENT policies and redistribution of income and wealth. See MIXED ECONOMY, GOVERNMENT ( PUBLIC) EXPENDITURE.
References in classic literature ?
No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.
No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the Ports of one State over those of another: nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.
No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States; and no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
The probability of incompatible alliances between the different States or confederacies and different foreign nations, and the effects of this situation upon the peace of the whole, have been sufficiently unfolded in some preceding papers.
They have come short of the perfect state through misunderstanding of the end or through ignorance of the proper means to the end.
The Greek doctrine that the essence of the state consists in community of purpose is the counterpart of the notion often held in modern times that the essence of the state is force.
If the state is the organisation of men seeking a common good, power and political position must be given to those who can forward this end.
Were an answer to this question to be sought, not by recurring to principles, but in the application of the term by political writers, to the constitution of different States, no satisfactory one would ever be found.
They ought, with equal care, to have preserved the FEDERAL form, which regards the Union as a CONFEDERACY of sovereign states; instead of which, they have framed a NATIONAL government, which regards the Union as a CONSOLIDATION of the States.
In several cases, and particularly in the trial of controversies to which States may be parties, they must be viewed and proceeded against in their collective and political capacities only.
Because, under the national government, treaties and articles of treaties, as well as the laws of nations, will always be expounded in one sense and executed in the same manner, -- whereas, adjudications on the same points and questions, in thirteen States, or in three or four confederacies, will not always accord or be consistent; and that, as well from the variety of independent courts and judges appointed by different and independent governments, as from the different local laws and interests which may affect and influence them.
Because the prospect of present loss or advantage may often tempt the governing party in one or two States to swerve from good faith and justice; but those temptations, not reaching the other States, and consequently having little or no influence on the national government, the temptation will be fruitless, and good faith and justice be preserved.