Fire

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Fire

Somewhat informal; to terminate the employment of an employee. An employee may be fired for cause, such as for sexual harassment or absenteeism, or, in many cases, without cause. A fired employee is often eligible to collect unemployment insurance for a certain period of time.
References in classic literature ?
She look at me very hard, then she says, 'When you start?' I say right away.
"You started it, I say, and I'll tell you why you started it."
Then he started violently, and terror blazed in his heart, for he felt that someone was behind him.
To the spectators it seemed as though they had all started simultaneously, but to the racers there were seconds of difference that had great value to them.
Then the mistake was made of putting too little shot on her, and she rose high in the air, got her bearings and started eastward across San Francisco Bay.
He started to go on with her, but Long thrust in front again.
And when the afternoon was nearly gone, and still there was no sign of rain, we tried to cheer ourselves up with the idea that it would come down all at once, just as the people had started for home, and were out of the reach of any shelter, and that they would thus get more drenched than ever.
When all was in readiness the three took their seats in the buggy and Jim started cautiously along the way, Zeb driving while the Wizard and Dorothy each held a lighted lantern so the horse could see where to go.
As we emerged into this river-bed path suddenly we started a troop of tall giraffes, who galloped, or rather sailed off, in their strange gait, their tails screwed up over their backs, and their hoofs rattling like castanets.
But gradually he took the fidgets in one leg, and then in the other leg, and then in one arm, and then in the other arm, and then in his chin, and then in his back, and then in his forehead, and then in his hair, and then in his nose; and then he stretched himself recumbent on two chairs, and groaned; and then he started up.
But then the cold began to strike through his clothes, and he started quickly away.
The little ant-- observing that I was noticing--turned him on his back, sunk his fangs into his throat, lifted him into the air and started vigorously off with him, stumbling over little pebbles, stepping on the spider's legs and tripping himself up, dragging him backward, shoving him bodily ahead, dragging him up stones six inches high instead of going around them, climbing weeds twenty times his own height and jumping from their summits--and finally leaving him in the middle of the road to be confiscated by any other fool of an ant that wanted him.